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Full Version: car is sorned, on my private property and clamped by DVLA!
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silverfox60017
came home today to find a clamp on my sons car
It has been sorned.... last sorn 24/11/12 and have a confirmation email
It is at the rear of my house and on my grass!!
Also it is completely covered
The bumf that comes with it implies it will be recovered after 24hrs!!

the DVLA site says
Date of liabilty 01 12 2013
First Reg 09 01 1981
Year 1981
CC 1493
Co2 N/a
Fuel petrol
Export marker N
Status Sorn not due

now this reads exactly as my sorned car (except for date)

Can they come onto my property and remove the car
It is accesible fromthe street BUT the car has not been on the road for some time, as the dents in the earth confirm
What action,apart from ringing the 01604 number and getting continual disconnected can we do
Park cars round it, chain it to the tree ,also on my property?
spacey2012
Does the "grass" have any kind of barrier from the road, example, gate, fence, rope, chain, if not make it so at once, anything, affix signs, saying
private property no right of access implied or otherwise, to the edge of the barrier, rope, chain.
If it can be driven or walked on to without barrier they can clamp and take it away as it is the highway.
In them meantime upload pictures or scans of this bumf as you call it.
martinbiz
QUOTE (spacey2012 @ Fri, 30 Nov 2012 - 18:40) *
Does the "grass" have any kind of barrier from the road, example, gate, fence, rope, chain, if not make it so at once, anything, affix signs, saying
private property no right of access implied or otherwise, to the edge of the barrier, rope, chain.
If it can be driven or walked on to without barrier they can clamp and take it away as it is the highway.
In them meantime upload pictures or scans of this bumf as you call it.


Tosh, don't advise if you don't know. You do not need any form of barrier or sign to demark your property or land from the highway, my front garden has no fence or barrier of any description to separate it from the adjoining road, but it is still my private property.


Can the OP give us a bit more info as to the relationship of where the car was parked, to his property
silverfox60017
Martinbiz
Hope this description helps

Garage is at rear of house. with a hard standing in front onto road This is about 18ft from garage door to road edge. the garden 'runs' alongside the garage for another 5ft and forms the back wall of the garden wall is parallel to road. There is grass from this wall to kerb edge.The grass area belongs to the houses as the house 2/3/4 (see below) have had the kerb dropped and their grass area paved to park the second car. As the council have plastered 'dont park on the grass' notices on lampposts i imagine they would have been the first to claim title if the grass were under their control
The house is a semi and there are three like this on our side of the road. so as i am the end house the area along the back goes
House 1 grass
house 1 Garage and 'forecourt'
House 2 Garage and 'forecourt' ( the garages are 'semi' as well'
House 2 Grass
House 3 Grass
House 3 Garage
House 4 Garage
House 4 Grass
House 5 grass
House 5 Garage
House 6 Garage
House 6 Grass

Came in tonight and saw the poor sod in house 6 has been clamped as well who is also parked on grass like me

I will say that when this last happened i about a year ago, i was outside when the clampers appeared and i told them that it was on private land and dont touch it. They left it alone. This time i wasnt around to tell them to FO
If you need a sketch to clarify i can post one tomorrow

Might also add car has been sorn'ed correctly for over 5yrs
AFAIAA there are no 'fines' etc. Jeez it hasnt even moved in that time
martinbiz
Ok, exactly who has clamped your car, is it a private parking company? If so what is the relevance to you checking the DVLA site, because of your reference to the them and sorn I was assuming it was something to do with them, but I guess not. I think this thread will need to be moved to the clamping section.

Can you scan all the paperwork you have been left and post it up, don't forget to wash it of any identifying information.
silverfox60017
Martinbiz,

The only papaerwork is a DVLA leaflet INF 32 and a yellow sticker
It is def a DVLA problem as i have just spent 30 mins talking to a manager who will not budge
Apparently according to him, yo prove it is my property i have to produce copies of my deeds (or let him know when i can get copies sent to me) by Monday. I rang the BS who are holding them and they are only open mon-fri 8,30-5,30.This he does not believe!!!!
So Mon AM i will have to run late on my booked pick ups because of this officious berk
qafqa
QUOTE
Apparently according to him, yo prove it is my property i have to produce copies of my deeds (or let him know when i can get copies sent to me) by Monday.

Have you considered the Land Registry.

Property ownership

You can confirm the ownership of a property online or by post.
Online

If the property can be identified by a single postal address, (for example, 23 Coniston Drive, Kerwick PL14 3JP) you can use our online service Find a property. Once you have registered for the service, you can enter the postal address of the property to view and download an electronic copy of its title register. The proprietorship register will reveal details of the current registered owner(s).

The fees are £3 for the title register and/or £3 for a title plan, payable by major credit or debit cards.

Note: The title register you download won't be an 'official copy' of the register, so can't be used as evidence in a court. To get official copies, see By post.

http://www.landregistry.gov.uk/public/faqs...of-the-property
redloner
IIRC you should be able to download a title plan plus other information from the Land Registry website;-

http://www.landregistry.gov.uk/public/online-services
spacey2012
QUOTE (martinbiz @ Fri, 30 Nov 2012 - 20:28) *
QUOTE (spacey2012 @ Fri, 30 Nov 2012 - 18:40) *
Does the "grass" have any kind of barrier from the road, example, gate, fence, rope, chain, if not make it so at once, anything, affix signs, saying
private property no right of access implied or otherwise, to the edge of the barrier, rope, chain.
If it can be driven or walked on to without barrier they can clamp and take it away as it is the highway.
In them meantime upload pictures or scans of this bumf as you call it.


Tosh, don't advise if you don't know. You do not need any form of barrier or sign to demark your property or land from the highway, my front garden has no fence or barrier of any description to separate it from the adjoining road, but it is still my private property.


Can the OP give us a bit more info as to the relationship of where the car was parked, to his property

See this case, I think you will find the court of appeal has already ruled on this issue, no barrier, or clearly defined boundary and they can enforce upon the land.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/8388077.stm

Now OP I have given you correct Legal advise upon the situation based upon the court of appeals ruling , fence the land off if it is private, with a rope, a chain, some old pallets, anything but certainly something that would need to be damaged to remove it and sign it as private land. They can not enter beyond your clearly defined boundary to remove anything without a court warrant.
At present, if it is open access land connected to the highway, they will attend and remove the vehicle.
I am not going to argue any further, the proof of the pudding will be what happens next.
I can only advise you of the current state of play, you are free to decline or accept any advice you see fit.

southpaw82
Have you read the judgment in that case? As I recall, whether land forms part of the highway is a matter of fact and in the doctor's case people had walked/driven over the land in question on a regular basis, making it part of the highway. Having the land fenced off etc is merely evidence that it is not part of the highway. So long as the OP's land isn't regularly used by vehicles or pedestrians to travel upon it should not be considered part of the highway.

localdriver
QUOTE (spacey2012 @ Sat, 1 Dec 2012 - 15:30) *
See this case, I think you will find the court of appeal has already ruled on this issue, no barrier, or clearly defined boundary and they can enforce upon the land.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/london/8388077.stm


That case is completely different, it involved parking on a footpath.

DVLA contractors have the power to enter land to clamp or remove unlicensed vehicles, except:

(a) any place which is within the curtilage of, or in the vicinity of, a dwelling-house, mobile home or houseboat and which is normally enjoyed with it, or

b) any place which is within the curtilage of, or in the vicinityof, a building consisting entirely (apart from common parts) of two or more dwellings and which is normally enjoyed only by the occupiers of one or more of those dwellings.”



Schedule 2A, Vehicles Excise & Registration Act 1994.
spacey2012
Whilst this is argued, the car will be towed away.
Fence the land in.
When the contractors enquire about the clamp instruct them they will need to make a written application for permission to enter the land to remove the clamp which will be subjected to a contractual agreement or you can remove it whilst they wait outside the land.
Use reasonable force to repel trespassers from the land.

The footpath/ grass verge point is of little relevance, the judgement is case law, private land is fair game unless it has a boundary marked or fenced.
Whilst arguing over deeds, the car will be long gone and the £ meter started.
You will notice quite a lot of private land owned by gentry is fenced, access is restricted, you can not just walk straight on and there is a historical and legal reason for this.

Same applies to people caught in supermarket car parks with no insurance or at car meetings cruise driving dangerously, the highway is what can be accessed.
We can argue all day long over footpaths vs grass, but the OP's car will be long gone and they will have to pay to recover it.
Fence the land if it is private, sign it, no right of access implied or otherwise, repel any trespasser as is your lawful right.

On the other point "curtilage" is in lawful (common law) any area defined by your marked or fenced boundary.
silverfox60017
qafqa



Can you be a dear and tell me the link for getting a title plan for £3.00?
I can only find a charge of £19.95



Thanks

qafqa



Can you be a dear and tell me the link for getting a plan for £3.00
I can only fin a charge of of £19.95



Thanks
localdriver
QUOTE (spacey2012 @ Sat, 1 Dec 2012 - 16:28) *
When the contractors enquire about the clamp instruct them they will need to make a written application for permission to enter the land to remove the clamp which will be subjected to a contractual agreement or you can remove it whilst they wait outside the land.
Use reasonable force to repel trespassers from the land.


They will not be trespassers or need permission, they will have lawful authority, unless (a) or (b) in my earlier post applies.
southpaw82
Spacey, from what I've seen of your posts so far your advice isn't a million miles away but it is often not correct. Please either research before you post and provide sources or simply state that its your opinion, rather than "correct legal advice".
spacey2012
QUOTE (localdriver @ Sat, 1 Dec 2012 - 16:40) *
QUOTE (spacey2012 @ Sat, 1 Dec 2012 - 16:28) *
When the contractors enquire about the clamp instruct them they will need to make a written application for permission to enter the land to remove the clamp which will be subjected to a contractual agreement or you can remove it whilst they wait outside the land.
Use reasonable force to repel trespassers from the land.


They will not be trespassers or need permission, they will have lawful authority, unless (a) or (b) in my earlier post applies.



Which if its fenced off as part of the boundary land, think cricket pitch boundary, one continuous ring otherwise it will be a "paddock" if a separate fence separates it from main curtilage and they can enter a paddock or open field or private land but not the curtilage area.
It will fall within curtilage of the property if fenced, ringed by rope, or any other definable boundary.
Curtilage is as said the defined marked or fenced land around your property within the area of your property, they can not lawfully enter your curtilage as we are using that term now to remove anything without court order.
This is Common law and DVLA are not exempt.
As of orders from the moderate this is now only my opinion.

The advice is yours to take.
Obtaining the plans may assist with the police removing the trespassers if you can sort the fence situation.
This is of course not withstanding that you own the land.
One thing is clear, once they lift the car, you will be arguing with a telephone operator.
Mr Rusty
QUOTE
IIRC you should be able to download a title plan plus other information from the Land Registry website;-

http://www.landregistry.gov.uk/public/online-services


To get a title plan follow the link, click "find a property" and you then get the option for a title plan for £3
qafqa
QUOTE
Can you be a dear and tell me the link for getting a title plan for £3.00?
I can only find a charge of £19.95

redloner and Mr Rusty have attached direct links to the source,
the Land Registry charges are all quoted in pounds (£3, £5, £7, £11, £23)
so the addition of that 95p makes the £19.95 charge appear unusual.

Portal fees
You can find a guide to our fees for these services below.

http://www.landregistry.gov.uk/professional/fees/portal-fees

A long shot, planning applications published on your council website
may include the site plans.
Concrete Jungle
Chain the car to the tree ASAP, can you get something else heavy (another car / motorbike etc) next to the car and chain the other axle to that as well? Get all your SORN confirmations together along with the deeds for your property. Speak to the neighbour who has been clamped in similar circumstances. Remember the DVLA don't make mistakes. wink.gif
silverfox60017
Gentlemen, of which you all are, an update

Following on from the info on the Land Registry, (did't know about that.... thanks to all) have now got a print showing the boundary of my property and it clearly shows the outline hich includes the space in dispute. So They are wrong by clamping

Now not being vindictive at all, how do i get their dangly bits? I want at the very least a grovelling apology, and can i claim damages for i have just noticed that th car cover, which would have had to be moved to ascertain the reg no. has been ripped. this could only have ben done b the goon looking under it or when he was fitting the now illegally done cllamp
Whats the best way to screw them?. Start by informing them i am going through the small claims court/ grief and distress caused/ damage to cover.etc etc



Thanks again. Knew i was in the right but the numpty on the other end of the phone started to give me doubts.Will update progress next week
southpaw82
A claim for trespass to goods sounds in order.
silverfox60017
Southpaw,

I am going to email the necessary proof to them sometime Monday.

Is there anyone who could give asistance on how to draft the email, on taking further action, claiming for damage to cover, and fees for copy of title( via small claims court if required). son thinks we should also bill them for storage of said clamp., and indicating that i might pursue legal action as you have stated above. All this will go **** up if the DVLA are exempt from illegal clamping!!, but as it was on private land, albeit accesible from the public highway and car was legally sorned , thee mut be a way in which to embarrass them big time.
Incandescent
Make them squeal in pain ! Trouble is there is absolutely no moral framework in these pseudo-government organisations. If you even get an apology, it is written with the fingers of their other hand crossed behind their back. Nobody gets sacked or even the slightest and mildest admonition.Only cash paid out will make them reflect.
Concrete Jungle
Still make sure the clamping goons can not remove the car when they return. Remember the DVLA don't make mistakes. wink.gif
qafqa
Someone with a video camera standing nearby so as not to intimidate
and recording their visit will be insurance against any unwarranted
behaviour on their part.

silverfox60017
Does anyone know if there has been an amndments to Sect 45 of th fiance act of 2008



will post the relevant bits later getting tired reading all this for a stiff letter to the DVLA
silverfox60017
Are these now poacher turned gamekeeper for the DVLA, (see post in Speeding and othe criminal ofences)

The number i have to ring is a 01604 one not swansea, Would this make my attack any different regading damage to the car cover and
them clamping on my pivate property
According to the Finance Act 2008 sect 45
>> I've found a couple of interesting links which suggest
>> that clamping on private property is, in certain circumstances,
>> unlawful. The first is the Finance Act 2008, which amends VERA
>> 1994. The relevant section can be found at
>> http://tinyurl.com/5nynpt Schedule 45, 5 (3): (1A) This Schedule
>> does not apply to- (a) any place which is within the curtilage of,
>> or in the vicinity of, a dwelling-house, mobile home or houseboat
>> and which is normally enjoyed with it, or
>> (b) any place which is within the curtilage of, or in the vicinity
>> of, a building consisting entirely (apart from common parts) of two
>> or more dwellings and which is normally enjoyed only by the
>> occupiers of one or more of those dwellings.
>>
>> The second is a response to a 2009 FOI request to DVLA. I can't
>> find the original, but it's quoted at http://tinyurl.com/369x62q:

Am i correct in saying that although the car was parked on private ground adjacnet to my driveway, that sub part a) covers it against clamping.

And if so can i go after the agents (via small claims court) for damage to my car cover ( which was covering the wheels and number plates, and must have been moved in order to clamp, and also grief and distress through this illegal clamping. My son says i should also charge them for storage as well even though it is on the car!!!

I have to send them an email showing title of land by tomorrow or they will remove.

sorry if the is a 'double post' but i think it may cover both DVLA and their agent ie a PPC



(edited to show correct name)
andy_foster
You've started a duplicate thread!
silverfox60017
Andy, i have put it on here as it is a PPC clamp( albeit an agent of the DVLA) My question is can i go after the PPC for claims/damages as they have clamped illegally acording to Sect 45 as i have listed above
silverfox60017
Now found out it is a DVLA agent VEAS who have clamped see thread in the PPC section
andy_foster
One case, one thread.
silverfox60017
So nobody has any knowledge how to deal with this sort of thing?
localdriver
As you he found, VEAS are contractors for the DVLA and it is the DVLA you need to deal with. Have you got confirmation that the vehicle was SORN on the day it was clamped?
southpaw82
QUOTE (silverfox60017 @ Sun, 2 Dec 2012 - 16:37) *
So nobody has any knowledge how to deal with this sort of thing?


People have plenty of knowledge and you've been given plenty of advice. You have found out how to discover where the boundaries of your property are and what powers the DVLA or their agents have. It's a Sunday, people have lives...
spacey2012
If your land is not fenced, the point I have offered my opinion upon will be the undoing.
The vehicle will most likely be lifted Monday at 6am, you will then be arguing with a telephone operator.
Fence, rope, chain, paint a line, the land off before they come back.
Make absolutely no mistake these people know the relevant legislation and case law at play here and what rights they have with regard to un marked land connected to the highway.
southpaw82
QUOTE (spacey2012 @ Sun, 2 Dec 2012 - 20:11) *
Make absolutely no mistake these people know the relevant legislation and case law at play here and what rights they have with regard to un marked land connected to the highway.


Perhaps you'd like to cite the relevant legislation and case law? Especially how whatever you cite applies to the circumstance in hand.
There are two issues at hand here. First, is the vehicle on a road maintainable at public expense. Second, is it now within the curtilage of a dwelling such that can not be seized. I'm not sure how fencing off post facto makes any material difference to these two points.
To help you out, here's what was said in Sinclair-Lockhart's Trustees v Central Land Board
QUOTE
ground which is used for the comfortable enjoyment of a house ... and thereby as an integral part of the same, although it has not been marked off or enclosed in any way. It is enough that it serves the purposes of the house ... in some necessary or reasonable useful way.

Also, James v Secretary of State for the Environment where it was held that there are three criteria: physical layout, ownership and use.
Being fenced in doesn't appear anywhere, in fact it is specifically held not to be required, though as I said before it can be evidence of curtilage (though it is not definitive).
ford poplar
My interpretation of original post info is that road tax was due on the 1st of month clamped but son did apply for SORN until 27th. DVLA put a marker on VRN as untaxed and no SORN and contractor clamped vehicle when located.
Was SORN applied for online or by post. Online normally gives immediate confrimation of SORN date. I don't think it can be backdated to 1st of month as vehicle could have been driven without tax or SORN in the interval
Lemac
OP mentioned confirmation email of SORN
silverfox60017
lemac and ford poplar.

The car has been regularly sorned for 6yrs to my knowledge. its a long term restoration projected and is protected by a cover (mainly to keep the bird lime off) It was resorned on 24/11 and now shows a date of liabilty of 01 12 2013 so the DVLA records are up to date.There are garages to the rear of the properties accessed by a road maintained by the council if it helps the three houses adjacent to me and the two end houses opposite have had the kerbs lowered in order to park off road inon thier piece of grass. They have also had the grass replaced by block paving, the chap opposite has his gravelled and parks his trailer on it. The only cost involved was for the lowering of the kerb
Two houses opposite have had the garden extended by means of a wall that is within parameters of height regulations. I for my own part have had a brick shed built ( the oustide wall forms part of the structure, but was refused planning permission to extend out from the existing rear wall on the grounds that extending the property by means of said building would 'affect the sight line of drivers leaving the other houses' However if i were to build a wooden shed then i could have it built up to 1m from the edge of the kerb as it would be considered 'a temporary structure' ok. As i was going from a wooden shed to a brick one i declined their offer and kept it within the existing building line, thus keeping my bit of grass intact. So Yes it is my property and not maintained by the council.the declaration on the sorn form only states that the car is not kept on a public road.

Just to play it safe ,i have now placed a rope indicating the extent of my property and a notice that reads

The area inside the rope boundary is private property. any attempt to remove this vehicle will result in the commencement of legal procedings in pursuant of the finance act 2008 section 45 which is listed below. There then is printed the schedule 45,5,(30 1A) (a)

If they do come round 'because they hadnt had the hold advised by the manager this just might put them off. I am also getting onto the DVLA to make a complaint against them and their agents that they have clamped a vehicle in contravention of this subsection, and if they claim that the clampers were unaware that it is private land i shall throw back at them their own text that is on the INF32 leaflet

No Exceptions No Excuses No Escape and to cap it Ignorance of the law is no excuse.

Tomorrow is going to be something!


I was tinking of running a cable to the vehicle with a note that said 'Battery being charged Danger of Electrocution if disturbed' but decided against it

localdriver
If there was a valid SORN declaration for the vehicle on the day it was clamped, Schedule 2A, Vehicles Excise & Registration Act 1994 (as amended by Schedule 45, Finance Act 2008) does not apply as that only applies to unlicensed vehicles, and a valid SORN declaration can be in place of a licence.

As the vehicle is on your own land, and not on a public road, a SORN declaration will be valid, but it is not unknown for VEAS to ignore that.
AFCNEAL
Is the headline issue here about whether the car is in fact on land owned by the OP? For example, some Social Housing never passes title to a buyer and existing council tenants don't 'own' 'their land'..........
localdriver
QUOTE (AFCNEAL @ Mon, 3 Dec 2012 - 13:05) *
Is the headline issue here about whether the car is in fact on land owned by the OP? For example, some Social Housing never passes title to a buyer and existing council tenants don't 'own' 'their land'..........


Not ownership as such. There are two matters that DVLA contractors have powers to clamp and remove vehicles, either an unlicensed (and not SORN) vehicle in any place, except if it is within the curtilege or vicinity of a dwelling, or an unlicensed vehicle used or kept on a public road.

The OP has established in post 21 that the car is on land within the boundary of the land his house is on, so if they are claiming that the vehicle was not licensed (or SORN), it could be considered that it is within the curtilege or vicinity of a dwelling, and should not have been clamped for that reason. It would also not be on a public road, so should not have been clamped for that reason either.
AFCNEAL
QUOTE (localdriver @ Mon, 3 Dec 2012 - 14:13) *
QUOTE (AFCNEAL @ Mon, 3 Dec 2012 - 13:05) *
Is the headline issue here about whether the car is in fact on land owned by the OP? For example, some Social Housing never passes title to a buyer and existing council tenants don't 'own' 'their land'..........


Not ownership as such. There are two matters that DVLA contractors have powers to clamp and remove vehicles, either an unlicensed (and not SORN) vehicle in any place, except if it is within the curtilege or vicinity of a dwelling, or an unlicensed vehicle used or kept on a public road.

The OP has established in post 21 that the car is on land within the boundary of the land his house is on, so if they are claiming that the vehicle was not licensed (or SORN), it could be considered that it is within the curtilege or vicinity of a dwelling, and should not have been clamped for that reason. It would also not be on a public road, so should not have been clamped for that reason either.


You may be right, but post 21 seems (to me) to identify a land registry boundary not necessarily one which is 'private property' where the OP is concerned (and having the need to check suggest all is not certain? I don't need to check to know where my property begins & ends?). Anyhow, I'm no fan of DVLA so I hope I'm wrong. but let's get absolute clarity from the OP to avoid any mis-advice?
ford poplar
Perhaps OP could provide Google Street View link or photos for the location?

Perhaps the LR boundary map?
The Rookie
Question - as the clamp has been unlawfully applied, would the OP not be totally within his rights to cut it off? Not the case on the public road or otherwise lawfully applied, but in this case......
localdriver
QUOTE (AFCNEAL @ Mon, 3 Dec 2012 - 15:41) *
You may be right, but post 21 seems (to me) to identify a land registry boundary not necessarily one which is 'private property' where the OP is concerned (and having the need to check suggest all is not certain? I don't need to check to know where my property begins & ends?). Anyhow, I'm no fan of DVLA so I hope I'm wrong. but let's get absolute clarity from the OP to avoid any mis-advice?


It doesn't necessarily have to be private property, only 'within the curtilage of, or in the vicinity of, a dwelling-house', which, according to the OP, it is.
silverfox60017
Ford poplar, and others psting today.

I have just got in, and have done a 'blown up section' of the title plan obtained from the Land registry

I will certainly post it on here PDQ so it can be looked at at leisure. The DVLA today ( 01792 something)told me that ownership of land doesn't matter, its who maintains it. If its the council, then where the car is, is considered a public highway.
Well the bit shown on the plans hasn't had a council worker on it since we moved there in 1987 and if it wa the council, and they are very strict on parking on verges etc, there has been cars parked on the more or less continiously since my son passed his test in 1996.


Plan coming in about 30mins after finishing dinner


Thanks
localdriver
QUOTE (silverfox60017 @ Mon, 3 Dec 2012 - 19:13) *
Ford poplar, and others psting today.

The DVLA today ( 01792 something)told me that ownership of land doesn't matter, its who maintains it. If its the council, then where the car is, is considered a public highway.


Only if it is a Public Road, which is:

(a) in England and Wales and Northern Ireland, means a road which is repairable at the public expense, and
(b) in Scotland, has the same meaning as in the Roads (Scotland) Act 1984.

S.62, Vehicles Excise & Registration Act 1994.


Even if the land is repairable at public expense, if it is not a road, it does not apply (public highway does not come into it).


If the DVLA get it wrong, it's no wonder their contractors do as well!!
silverfox60017
Here is the map as supplied by the land registry with additional notes added by me
The car is parked on the htched area,within the boundaries as advised by LR
Houses 1 2 3 had grass and raised kerbs, but now they are lowered kerbs and grass replaced by paving.House 4 has lowered kerb and area gravelled
Area A is the council run for services and is denoted on my drive by a divided section of concrete or tarmac on that now lowered
Area B is maintained bt the council (not very often i might add) and is graa with shrubs to the rear of the garages, there are also tow trees
We have maintained the area within the lines from moving in in 1986.
The council have never requested for a vehicle to be moved nor attended to any maintainence at all
The area has been used a a second car space since my son passed his test in 1996
The clampers wanted to see proof of my ownership of the land. i am sending them the copy of the original tomorrow.
DVLA however claim that even though the car is on my land if it is maintained by the council it is fair game. But it (the ground) also meets the requirements laid down in part (a) of Schedule 45, which has been posted earler. Hoprfully yhe clampers will accept this as proof and release the clamp.!

Click to view attachmentSorry.
Here is the map!!!
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