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Mnki
Hello,

I was stopped by police in March and cautioned for speeding (police car was coming other way so they never actually measured my speed).

They then went through their usual checks of insurance, tax and MOT which were all fine. They then checked my licence with the DVLA and to my horror it turns out my licence had been revoked for the past 6 years. My car was then impounded.

Today I have received a summons for driving with no licence and [therefore] no insurance.

My argument is that I was never informed of the revocation of my licence (or even the reason for revocation). My licence was always registered at my parents address, as I have had too many problems with post going missing due to living in flats and shared houses.
The DVLA say I would have received 3 letters informing me of the revocation, but I haven't seen them. My parents certainly never throw away any mail addressed to me.

Had I known I didn't have a valid licence, I would have done something about it immediately. It amazes me that i've spent thousands of pounds on insurance over the past 6 years which was completely invalid! Also, for two years I had a job which required driving a company car every day - I guess the company didn't actually check driving licences as they said they did.

Is this worth going to court for, or should I just plead guilty and hope for a reasonable fine and less than 8 points?

Thanks for reading, any help is much appreciated.
nemo
QUOTE (Mnki @ Mon, 18 Aug 2008 - 18:48) *
Today I have received a summons for driving with no licence and [therefore] no insurance.

Have you read your policy wording or confirmed with your insurer that you were actually uninsured ?

Most insurance policies are worded such that '....must hold a licence to drive a vehicle of that type or has held and is not disqualified from obtaining a licence'.
Zed Victor One
Do you now know why your licence was revoked? Also you say your licence has always been registered at your parents address unfortunately the DVLA response to this is more than likely to be that it is in itself an offence to fail to notify a change of address irrespective of your fears regarding postal deliveries.
Presumably you held a full licence for one or more classes of vehicle, have you had any endorsements or medical problems that would have led to it's revocation?
As nemo suggested check with your insurance company as quite often provided you hold or have held and are not disqualified from obtaining such a licence, which is entirely different to revocation, then most insurers will still honour the policy.

fatboytim
QUOTE (Zed Victor One @ Mon, 18 Aug 2008 - 19:18) *
Do you now know why your licence was revoked? Also you say your licence has always been registered at your parents address unfortunately the DVLA response to this is more than likely to be that it is in itself an offence to fail to notify a change of address irrespective of your fears regarding postal deliveries.



I understood it had to be an address through which you could be contacted,
myself working in construction contracting and often living in digs that regularly changed and having had no other 'permanent' home, my licence was registered at my parents address which was also my Ltd.Co's registered office. When stopped by the police I have never had a problem when I have explained this.

fatboytim

Landshark
I believed also as long as it was an address at which you could still obtain your post, for example a family member lives there than this would be acceptable.

Also i think you willl find that most insurers will insure you at least third party as for the reasons already pointed out.
Fraggle Rock
QUOTE (Zed Victor One @ Mon, 18 Aug 2008 - 19:18) *
Also you say your licence has always been registered at your parents address unfortunately the DVLA response to this is more than likely to be that it is in itself an offence to fail to notify a change of address irrespective of your fears regarding postal deliveries.


Is that so?

A friend of mine has recently split from her husband and is currently in rented accommodation while their house is sold. Her husband has stayed in their house. As she is not intending to permanently stay in the house she is currently in, she enquired as to whether it was worth her changing the address on her licence to that addresss. She was told that as long as she was traceable/contactable at the address that her licence shows, she need not change it until she is in more permanent accommodation. She is traceable/contactable at her previous address as her husband still lives there.

Another friend's daughter is going to university miles away from her parents' home and has been told that she can leave her licence registered at her parents' home as the student accommodation is not permanent.
Landshark
As for student accomadation, it is not a permanent address and the student normally returns to the address on the licence (parents) out of term time, as before as long as its an address that they can receive mail at then there should be no probs.

As for your friend that has split, i would advise that if it was not amicable split to go to the local post office to have her mail redirected to the place she is now, this can be done over varying time scales (may have to pay a fee)
Zed Victor One
That's fine clearly you know the law better than I, I just hope the people that you are referring to have some record of who they spoke to and when and confirmation of there exemption from the law, a direct lift of which comes from the DVLA website -

On average one in five drivers in the UK fail to notify DVLA when their details change and this impacts on the work of the Police and local councils to reduce car crime and improve road safety. It is a legal requirement to hold an accurate, up to date driving licence and motorists who fail to notify DVLA of a change in name and/or address could face a £1000 fine.

Whilst clearly it would be impractical to notify changes of a temporary nature and petty in some instances to enforce it, it does not alter the fact that it is an offence not to notify them.

I've personally been involved in trying to contact relatives through information taken from an outdated licence the person had in their possession and sadly by the time we traced the correct address their relatives arrived too late at the hospital and the person had passed away. Now a few minutes wasn't going to save their life but the opportunity to be present for those last few minutes before the person passed away was denied them because the deceased hadn't bothered to update his address.

Fraggle Rock
QUOTE (Landshark @ Mon, 18 Aug 2008 - 19:46) *
As for your friend that has split, i would advise that if it was not amicable split to go to the local post office to have her mail redirected to the place she is now, this can be done over varying time scales (may have to pay a fee)


It is an amicable split.

QUOTE (Zed Victor One @ Mon, 18 Aug 2008 - 19:58) *
I've personally been involved in trying to contact relatives through information taken from an outdated licence the person had in their possession and sadly by the time we traced the correct address their relatives arrived too late at the hospital and the person had passed away. Now a few minutes wasn't going to save their life but the opportunity to be present for those last few minutes before the person passed away was denied them because the deceased hadn't bothered to update his address.


That is the point, however.

The people in question and their next of kin (and my friend's husband is still her legal next of kin as they are not yet divorced) are contactable at the addresses on their licences.
bluetunes
Hi,

I'd suggest the most important thing to do would be to find out the reason why your driving licence was revoked in the first place and then take things from there.

Zed Victor One
That is the point, however.

The people in question and their next of kin (and my friend's husband is still her legal next of kin as they are not yet divorced) are contactable at the addresses on their licences.

I fear that the point has been missed, yes there will always be exceptions like the person who lived because they were not wearing a seat belt rather than because they were. It doesn't alter the fact that it is an offence and by failing to notify DVLA the OP may have put himself in the position he finds himself in now.

Anyway it would be helpful to any advice if the OP could update the thread as to whether he now knows why his licence was revoked?
Keeper
As regards adresses, DVLA sent my licence & V5 to a PO Box number without a word of complaint. I certainly do not live in the post office, but I do collect all my mail there regularly.
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