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WapChimney
A car hire company I used received the Austrian equivalent of a NIP and named me as the driver.

Does anyone have experience of foreign fines? Are they likely to even send it through to me once they see it's a UK address? How would I challenge it when I speak no German?

The car hire company charged me a €12 admin fee for this - should I fight them for it back?


davepoth
They'll probably send the request to you, and ask for a fine. You won't get any points on your UK license though.

a €12 fee doesn't sound that unreasonable - it's less than £10. While you could fight it, I doubt you would want to attend an Austrian Small Claims Court.
Pete D
No it's no doubt in the contract of hire as may be extracting the fine directly from you credit card. If they do not receive the payment you may find you are held as immigration next time you visit and the fine extracted from you after several hours of messing about Pay it an forget it there are no points on your UK license. If the hire company get too much grief they may bar you from renting with them again. Pete D
WapChimney
I booked it using avis.co.uk - doesn't that mean I can claim it back from Avis UK? (Also shows they're obviously integrated enough to pass booking through to one another)

Out of curiosity, what might happen if I ignored the fine? Any guesses?
mustdash
My old dear recieved a fine from the Italians about 18 months ago (how she was clocked speeding, God knows - Miss Daisy would put my mother to shame!). Anyway, the letter came through (all in Italian) to the home address. She sent a letter back, in English, asking for the letter to be sent in English so that she could understand. They sent another couple of official looking letters, which each got the same reply. Since then, nothing! Personally, I'd ignore, especially if you're not planning on going back there for some time!!
emenjay
How did you find out about the NIP? If all that has happened is the hire company has informed you, then you need do nothing until (if) you get a NIP yourself. If it is not in English, do as mustdash says and ask for an English translation. Spin it out as long as possible, they'll probably give up. Check the terms and conditions of hire, if you booked through Avis UK then your contract was with them. If their T&C state you are liable for the handling fee, then pay it, cos worse may follow from Avis if you don't.
I got stopped in Eire near Cork last year in a NI registered hire car, Officer took my DL details and I got their equivalent COFP through the post direct. The officer told me they would not be able to put the points on my license and regarding the fine, quote "it's up to you whether you pay the fine or not, but we have no extradition policy with the mainland, if you read between the lines of what I'm saying" unquote.
Needless to say, did nothing and been back twice since with no problems.
Watcher
QUOTE (davepoth @ Wed, 21 May 2008 - 11:54) *
They'll probably send the request to you, and ask for a fine. You won't get any points on your UK license though.

a €12 fee doesn't sound that unreasonable - it's less than £10. While you could fight it, I doubt you would want to attend an Austrian Small Claims Court.



May I point out that, unless you are American, it is spelt 'licence'? happy.gif
Thank you
jaykay
There is nothing to stop you disputing the charge on your credit card - at the very least it will mean the rental company having to do a lot of extra work which they cannot charge you for.

Until the "fine" is paid (and personally I wouldn't pay it), there is no offence - only an allegation. So why should you have to pay for your name being provided?

You should be able to download the forms to dispute the charge - the credit card company has to refund your money, then contact the hire car co who have to prove the charge. As this could cost them more than the charge they are claiming they may choose not to do the work.

Teufel
almost certainly you agreed to the charge on the contract

consumer law has found the charge fair (even 25 quid is apparently fair)

unless you plan on going back to austria within a year just ignore the notice
WapChimney
JayKay - they company have only charged me for the inconvenience of having to pass on my details. No fine has actually been sent yet to either me or them.

Teufel - yes, I agreed to the charges in the T&Cs but that doesn't mean they're lawful & enforceable, as has been proved with the Bank Charges stuff. Do you have more info on the piece of Consumer Law you refer to? Was it a specific case?
The Rookie
I would think you would struggle to show that £10 was excessive.....£25 yes, £10, no....

Simon
jaykay

It's nothing to do with excessive charges, it's to do with ANY charges.

Until a fine is paid there is no offence, only an allegation. Agreeing to pay such charges in terms and conditions is similar to PPCs and their parking signage -

What prevents an unscrupulous person from obtaining hire car registration numbers, and sending fictitious parking tickets to the hire car company - knowing full well that many of them will get paid.

Dispute the charge on principal whatever the amount - all it takes is some spare time.
Teufel
TO REPEAT !!!!!!!

the charge is for passing on the details from an official demand
this has been to court in the UK and the contarct was valid

25 quid was reasonable

the situation with unenforcebale private charges is different
axeman
This is another reason that when I rent a car abroad (even if booked via the web in the UK) I always report the card I have paid with as lost, indeed on the last occasion in the USA I did this within 5 minutes of returning the car, there was a que for checking the vehicle condition and I needed to be in the airport quickly. I did not want to be hit with charges for alleged damage I could not defend later. This ensures no payments are taken without my knowledge and its easier to argue when the money is in my bank and not theirs.
The Rookie
QUOTE (jaykay @ Thu, 22 May 2008 - 21:59) *
It's nothing to do with excessive charges, it's to do with ANY charges.

Until a fine is paid there is no offence, only an allegation. Agreeing to pay such charges in terms and conditions is similar to PPCs and their parking signage -

What prevents an unscrupulous person from obtaining hire car registration numbers, and sending fictitious parking tickets to the hire car company - knowing full well that many of them will get paid.

Dispute the charge on principal whatever the amount - all it takes is some spare time.


Read thread, engage brain and then (and only then) put finger to keyboard......

The charge (IMHO a not unreasonable one) is for the hire co's costs in passing details of the hirer to the requestor, a police force (I would assume) who have (again an assumption backed by the findings in Weh v Austria) a legal right to request that info!

Simon
adev
QUOTE (Watcher @ Wed, 21 May 2008 - 13:28) *
May I point out that, unless you are American, it is spelt 'licence'? happy.gif
Thank you


I am half American and I always spell it liCence! Being American is no excuse to spell badly!
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