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mactheknife
I received a nip about 6 weeks ago from Cleveland police, doing 46 in 30 zone. I'm in Lancashire but had some advice from a policeman in Cleveland to ignore the nip because they would have to hand deliver the nip again (which they wouldn't do). 3 weeks ago I received another which I put in the bin. Today I received a recorded delivery notice from the royal mail saying they needed a signature for a letter (I was at work when they came). I'm now getting a bit twitchy. Can I continue to ignore these or will I face a stiffer penalty.
I've already got 6 points and been on a speed awareness course. 36 in a 30 and 35 in a 30.
jeffreyarcher
Fisrt things first; you'll have to see what's in the recorded delivery letter, won't you.
mactheknife
If I ignore the letter it will be returned after a week. Then I'm hoping that they will leave me alone. But does anyone know what the next steps would be? Thanks for any replies.
jeffreyarcher
But it might be a summons! If you ignore it, you'll just be convicted in your absence.
mactheknife
so are you saying that i should receive this letter? i didn't think i could be convicted if i wasn't aware of any offence.
DW190
Got to agree with jeffreyarcher.

(Deemed to have been served even if it is returned undelivered) springs to mind.
The Rookie
Pretty poor advice to be honest, you may as well get it and read it, otherwise you will be summons and convicetd of S172 and end up with the bailiffs at your door and the car clamped after twice as much....won't be able to ignore it then!

Simon
Rosewell
Not exactly the sharpest knife in the drawer, Mac?

Do you really think that by ignoring the slow grinding process of the law it will just gind to a halt and go away?

It just changes down a gear and slowly, ever so slowly, will grind you up and spit you out.

The executive forces love people like you, who do nothing, they just keep multiplying the original figure [fine] by whatever figure they feel is appropriate and send the boys in to take your car, telly, washing machine, stereo, whatever. No goods to have snached? Attachment of earnings then. No job? Take it out of your benefits. They will prevail, eventually. Fact of life Mac.

'Ignore it and it will go away' is never good advice, [It's not a spot] deal with it and do so quickly as the clock is ticking you have already wasted time.

..... Oh the shark has pearly teeth dear........
mactheknife
Not exactly the sharpest knife in the drawer dontknow.gif
probably not but many thanks again for your querky but informative replies. I'm off down the post office!
Homer
QUOTE (mactheknife)
had some advice from a policeman in Cleveland to ignore the nip because they would have to hand deliver the nip again (which they wouldn't do).


I can only assume this was Cleveland Ohio. tongue.gif

It was very bad advice, the copper obviously has no idea.

Sending you the NIP once is all they have to do, as far as the law is concerned you have recieved it rolleyes.gif . Anything else they do before sending you a summons is completely out of the goodness of their heart.
jeffreyarcher
QUOTE (Homer)
It was very bad advice, the copper obviously has no idea.

Perhaps, though, macktheknife's policeman friend was giving the information on the basis of his own or his colleague's experiences, and he did not realise that such special treatment was only available for members of that force. icon_evil.gif
Odd Job
QUOTE
A review of the case by Cleveland police has concluded that Mr Roberts will not face prosecution.  



Thats strange...............................I was lead to believe that it was the CPS who decided if a prosecution was "in the public interest".

Anyone else and it would be the magistrates deciding if they could remember who was driving.
jeffreyarcher
QUOTE (Odd Job)
QUOTE
A review of the case by Cleveland police has concluded that Mr Roberts will not face prosecution.  

Thats strange...............................I was lead to believe that it was the CPS who decided if a prosecution was "in the public interest".

Presumably the police can quite simply usurp that function by not laying the complaint / forwarding the papers.
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