PePiPoo Helping the motorist get justice Support health workers

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

Security - swabs taken at Westfield Stratford, Can they do it?
Glitch
post Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 09:31
Post #1


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 1,145
Joined: 28 Aug 2010
From: Centre of the Universe
Member No.: 40,127



I am a regular visitor to Westfield Stratford Shopping complex. It is also the site for the 2012 Olympics.

Security is somewhat above a normal shopping centre and will no doubt tighten a lot more before July.

On driving into the site - just to go shopping or drop my son off for his part time job there is a chance to be selected for a vehicle check.
All they have done to date is look in the boot. It takes seconds. Staff look as though they must be on minimum wage.
I had to point out that Honda CR-V's have a big well under the boot floor. Big enough to hide something significant.

Anyway, yesterday as I got out of the car they helped themselves to a swab of the steering wheel and gearstick. No asking permission or explanation.
When asked the guy said they were checking for "dangerous substances". I asked if my DNA was going to be destroyed and his only retort was that it would have his on it too.
They let me drive off before there was any analysis. I was in a hurry to pick up my son otherwise I would have been more challenging about it.

Any ideas what they are allowed to take and keep and under what laws?

This post has been edited by Glitch: Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 09:32
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
3 Pages V  < 1 2 3  
Start new topic
Replies (40 - 47)
Advertisement
post Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 09:31
Post #


Advertise here!









Go to the top of the page
 
Quote Post
dom
post Mon, 23 Apr 2012 - 10:36
Post #41


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 95
Joined: 3 Jan 2008
Member No.: 16,389



QUOTE (Glitch @ Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 11:28) *
Reminds me of the guys checking the shopping at the exit in Costco's Checking the bill against what is in the trolley¬ biggrin.gif



I always used to think that until they pulled me up fro having the wrong amount of items in a very packed trolley.


They were correct - I had left one at the checkout!


Dom
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
glasgow_bhoy
post Mon, 23 Apr 2012 - 11:29
Post #42


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 10,460
Joined: 8 Sep 2008
Member No.: 22,424



QUOTE (Transit man @ Wed, 18 Apr 2012 - 16:07) *
QUOTE (Glitch @ Tue, 17 Apr 2012 - 23:59) *
QUOTE
polish girl, greets me with a smile & helps [me] unload, which in this case is by hand

Yeah I get your drift. Good looking Polish girl helping you unload by hand. wub.gif

As a happily married man I take issue with that inuendo ohmy.gif , but did I say, she IS very attractive biggrin.gif
QUOTE (jdh @ Wed, 18 Apr 2012 - 00:03) *
That bit's understandable, it's the White British blokes watching him unload himself while they wait for their magazines that worry me ohmy.gif

Whatever turns them on, but I reckon they must be closet bankers, as I am delivering the Economist magazine biggrin.gif BTW, did anyone read last weeks issue. I have been awaiting GBs take on it ohmy.gif


My takes been quiet cos I've not read this topic lol. But I must have an opinion on everything, so here goes.

I would never read a paper, journal or otherwise where people right in with 'Dear Sir'. That is like reading the Telegraph, and I would never do that. Infact I would rather burn it. I think indipendance will be a disaster for Scotland and indeed the UK. However for that pile of junk to depict such a ridiculous cover of Scotland shows that they should be put out of business for sheer arseholishness.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Transit man
post Mon, 23 Apr 2012 - 19:50
Post #43


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 5,002
Joined: 17 Mar 2008
From: Worcestershire
Member No.: 18,111



QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Mon, 23 Apr 2012 - 12:29) *
I would never read a paper, journal or otherwise where people right in with 'Dear Sir'. That is like reading the Telegraph, and I would never do that. Infact I would rather burn it. I think indipendance will be a disaster for Scotland and indeed the UK. However for that pile of junk to depict such a ridiculous cover of Scotland shows that they should be put out of business for sheer arseholishness.

No way, the contract I have with them amounts to 25-30% of my turnover, you leave them to print what the hell they like biggrin.gif


--------------------
Now driving a Mercedes Sprinter, the Transit died of too much work.
Results for last 5 years:-
12 PPC tickets received, 0 paid
2 Council tickets received, 0 paid (both canceled)
2 Nip's in 40 years 1 paid (damn!)
1 SAC, duly educated!

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hotel Oscar 87
post Tue, 24 Apr 2012 - 12:26
Post #44


Member
Group Icon

Group: Life Member
Posts: 3,737
Joined: 23 Sep 2006
From: Way, way off-shore
Member No.: 7,833



QUOTE (Pinback @ Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 19:02) *
QUOTE (mike848 @ Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 18:59) *
Post-NuLabour Britain in a nutshell...


Absolutely. Welcome to Harriet Harmans Cultural Marxist PC Police Nanny state.(Its important to recognise this is a cultural marxist state and not a fascist state, huge political difference, same personal effect)

I agree that there is a difference between marxism and fascism but it depends on which model you choose to compare with the other. Were we, for example, to use a Moaist model of marxism as our yardstick then a necessary component of its creation is the toppling of capitalism by a popular, i.e. peoples, or proletarian uprising. There has been no such revolution in this country and there is unlikely ever to be. By the same token, were we to attempt to use a Hitlerian model to assess our current position then we would quickly see that the nationalism that sat at the core of that philosophy is totally lacking.

However, one of the fundamental principals of fascism is the role of corporations, indeed, fascism can be alternatively defined as corporatism and this more closely matches the system we currently "enjoy", I would contend, than any marxist-style system that necessarily excludes capitalism as a central tenet. Unless of course you subscribe to the idea that what we see is better described as syndicalism in which case, of course, there are greater number of examples of that amongst more socialist systems than broadly nationalist/fascist.

I think that one of the telling aspects of our so-called system (a system implies coherence and one wonders where that is?) is the way in which companies (and I distinguish them from corporations) are now no longer seen as providers of employment and generators of wealth alone but as actors for social change. Companies drive health programmes - look at Sainsburys food labelling, for example, or at the growth of academies in the education sector - overtly corporatist, or what? One might also argue that the way in which the Olympics are to be policed (by all members of the "wider policing family") is simply a means of introducing a baser level of policing to the broader population and thereby conditioning them to accept it.

Anyway, I'm done with politics. The colour no longer matters but the intention - velvet totalitarianism - is as plain as a pikestaff. Champagne chuggers of the world unite. wink.gif


--------------------
“Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a tu.rd by the clean end.” - R.J. Wiedemann, Lt. Col. USMC Ret.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sgtdixie
post Wed, 25 Apr 2012 - 15:40
Post #45


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 9,529
Joined: 5 May 2011
From: UK
Member No.: 46,399



QUOTE
I think that one of the telling aspects of our so-called system (a system implies coherence and one wonders where that is?) is the way in which companies (and I distinguish them from corporations) are now no longer seen as providers of employment and generators of wealth alone but as actors for social change. Companies drive health programmes - look at Sainsburys food labelling, for example, or at the growth of academies in the education sector - overtly corporatist, or what?


Fast forward to the Victorian era.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jobo
post Wed, 25 Apr 2012 - 16:32
Post #46


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 13,506
Joined: 9 Jan 2008
From: manchester
Member No.: 16,521



thjere vs a story knocking about on one of the police sites of a reporter taking pictures of the 02 from public land and the security rushing out and effectively arresting him whilst the police were called, neither the police or indeed 02 could see anything wrong with this as there is an ''elevated risk'' so there seems no end of possibility of a private police force operating buring the olimpic

il post when i can find it

here
http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/apr/1...ity-photography
Very quickly the reporter was challenged by O2 security guards, who made a series of demands with no basis in law. They ordered that the filming stop – "We've requested you to not do it because we don't like it" – and that they be shown any existing footage. Asked on what basis they could demand this, one replied: "It's under the terrorist law. We are an Olympic venue." Another added: "You have, for want of a better word, breached our security by videoing it [the O2]."

At one point they refused to allow the reporter to leave. One said: "It's gone too far for that

and comicaly
The incident at the O2 was eventually resolved after guards called police, who also asked to see the video footage, citing the Terrorism Act. The reporter was allowed to leave after neither he nor the police could properly operate the camera to replay the footage.

This post has been edited by jobo: Wed, 25 Apr 2012 - 16:47


--------------------
jobo

anyone but Murray, Wish granted for another year,
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ocelot
post Wed, 25 Apr 2012 - 19:06
Post #47


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 3,105
Joined: 19 Jun 2004
From: Surrey
Member No.: 1,326



QUOTE (Hotel Oscar 87 @ Tue, 24 Apr 2012 - 13:26) *
QUOTE (Pinback @ Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 19:02) *
QUOTE (mike848 @ Sun, 15 Apr 2012 - 18:59) *
Post-NuLabour Britain in a nutshell...


Absolutely. Welcome to Harriet Harmans Cultural Marxist PC Police Nanny state.(Its important to recognise this is a cultural marxist state and not a fascist state, huge political difference, same personal effect)

I agree that there is a difference between marxism and fascism but it depends on which model you choose to compare with the other. Were we, for example, to use a Moaist model of marxism as our yardstick then a necessary component of its creation is the toppling of capitalism by a popular, i.e. peoples, or proletarian uprising. There has been no such revolution in this country and there is unlikely ever to be. By the same token, were we to attempt to use a Hitlerian model to assess our current position then we would quickly see that the nationalism that sat at the core of that philosophy is totally lacking.

However, one of the fundamental principals of fascism is the role of corporations, indeed, fascism can be alternatively defined as corporatism and this more closely matches the system we currently "enjoy", I would contend, than any marxist-style system that necessarily excludes capitalism as a central tenet. Unless of course you subscribe to the idea that what we see is better described as syndicalism in which case, of course, there are greater number of examples of that amongst more socialist systems than broadly nationalist/fascist.

I think that one of the telling aspects of our so-called system (a system implies coherence and one wonders where that is?) is the way in which companies (and I distinguish them from corporations) are now no longer seen as providers of employment and generators of wealth alone but as actors for social change. Companies drive health programmes - look at Sainsburys food labelling, for example, or at the growth of academies in the education sector - overtly corporatist, or what? One might also argue that the way in which the Olympics are to be policed (by all members of the "wider policing family") is simply a means of introducing a baser level of policing to the broader population and thereby conditioning them to accept it.

Anyway, I'm done with politics. The colour no longer matters but the intention - velvet totalitarianism - is as plain as a pikestaff. Champagne chuggers of the world unite. wink.gif



Nope, didn't catch a word of that...but it sounds damn saucy!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOSYiT2iG08

This post has been edited by Ocelot: Wed, 25 Apr 2012 - 19:10
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
WageSlave
post Thu, 26 Apr 2012 - 13:51
Post #48


Member


Group: Members
Posts: 1,887
Joined: 12 Sep 2011
Member No.: 49,581



QUOTE (Hotel Oscar 87 @ Tue, 24 Apr 2012 - 12:26) *
However, one of the fundamental principals of fascism is the role of corporations, indeed, fascism can be alternatively defined as corporatism and this more closely matches the system we currently "enjoy", I would contend, than any marxist-style system that necessarily excludes capitalism as a central tenet. Unless of course you subscribe to the idea that what we see is better described as syndicalism in which case, of course, there are greater number of examples of that amongst more socialist systems than broadly nationalist/fascist.

I think that one of the telling aspects of our so-called system (a system implies coherence and one wonders where that is?) is the way in which companies (and I distinguish them from corporations) are now no longer seen as providers of employment and generators of wealth alone but as actors for social change. Companies drive health programmes - look at Sainsburys food labelling, for example, or at the growth of academies in the education sector - overtly corporatist, or what?


On the question of whether or not we are living in a corporatist state I was for a time mildly baffled at why I could not vote for Tesco or Sainsburys in a general election. The people behind these sterling organisations appear to do a cracking job of running them. It's hard to believe that they could not do a better job of running the country than either the current bunch of muppets or the last lot of muppets. Both of these giants of retail are forever looking to expand what they do from the mere selling of groceries. They now sell clothes, medecines, electrical goods, various kinds of insurance and banking services, the sexual services of the finest women plucked from every corner of the globe [OK I made that last one up. You can't yet visit a Tesco branded brothel.].

So, given their urge to provide us with everything, why have they not moved into politics?

Then, of course, the answer came to me: politics doesn't actually matter all that much. Not as it is practised in the UK anyway. If it did I would surely already be able to vote for Tesco.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V  < 1 2 3
Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Advertisement

Advertise here!

RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: Sunday, 5th December 2021 - 14:35
Pepipoo uses cookies. You can find details of the cookies we use here along with links to information on how to manage them.
Please click the button to accept our cookies and hide this message. We’ll also assume that you’re happy to accept them if you continue to use the site.