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The 'willing to go to jail to avoid speeding' thread
The Rookie
post Wed, 13 Jun 2018 - 09:48
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Maybe rather than keep starting posts we can put them into one as a warning to others

Two speeding events, not his van honest guvnor, jailed for 6 months.


And from the archives under the status of legendary
Andy Roo (ex of this parish)

Chris Huhne and the ex Mrs Huhne

And a future volunteer it seems

This post has been edited by The Rookie: Wed, 13 Jun 2018 - 09:50


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There is no such thing as a law abiding motorist, just those who have been scammed and those yet to be scammed!

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post Wed, 13 Jun 2018 - 09:48
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southpaw82
post Wed, 13 Feb 2019 - 21:41
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QUOTE (Roverboy @ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 - 21:32) *
My beef with all of this is that courts / judges seem to treat someone trying to dodge a minor offense way more harshly than way more serious crimes such as muggings and burglary.

And I'm sure if some want examples I can find them.

The courts don’t treat PCOJ as a minor offence though.


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cp8759
post Wed, 13 Feb 2019 - 23:42
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QUOTE (Korting @ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 - 18:00) *
I take it such special paint is not available from the likes of B&Q, Homebase or Wickes.

No you'd have to get it from a car respray place I presume, once someone perfects it.


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I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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The Rookie
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 09:59
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Google ‘Vantablack’ but you’ll still have headlamps, number plate and a windscreen that will happily reflect, so the benefit of a ‘stealth’ paint job are probably marginal.


--------------------
There is no such thing as a law abiding motorist, just those who have been scammed and those yet to be scammed!

S172's
Rookies 1-0 Kent

Council PCN's
Rookies 1-0 Warwick
Rookies 1-0 Birmingham

PPC PCN's
Rookies 8-0 PPC's
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Fredd
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 10:55
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There's also the minor problem that if they suddenly found that their equipment couldn't get a reading from one of dozens they'd targeted during that session, you could expect a visit from plod just the same as if you'd used a jammer. And as Rookie says, there'll be returns from plenty of other parts of the vehicle, which'll just heighten their suspicions.


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typefish
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 11:51
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QUOTE (DancingDad @ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 - 12:57) *
One is a deliberate attempt to avoid detection, the other is simply taking advantage of readily available information, no different to learning where the cameras are on a regular route.
Very difficult to prove any intent to break the law by using a phone or satnav device to show camera location.
A lot simpler when a device is fitted which seems to have the sole purpose of defeating speed cameras.


I'd say using something like Waze to figure out where police activity would be, especially when you know you may be over the drink drive limit, is pretty intentional
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cp8759
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 12:54
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QUOTE (Fredd @ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 10:55) *
There's also the minor problem that if they suddenly found that their equipment couldn't get a reading from one of dozens they'd targeted during that session, you could expect a visit from plod just the same as if you'd used a jammer. And as Rookie says, there'll be returns from plenty of other parts of the vehicle, which'll just heighten their suspicions.

They'd be hard-pressed to show that your car was coated in vantalack because you wanted to evade speed detection, rather than because it makes your car look cool. Thinking about it, it would look pretty cool.


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I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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DancingDad
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 14:21
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QUOTE (typefish @ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 11:51) *
QUOTE (DancingDad @ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 - 12:57) *
One is a deliberate attempt to avoid detection, the other is simply taking advantage of readily available information, no different to learning where the cameras are on a regular route.
Very difficult to prove any intent to break the law by using a phone or satnav device to show camera location.
A lot simpler when a device is fitted which seems to have the sole purpose of defeating speed cameras.


I'd say using something like Waze to figure out where police activity would be, especially when you know you may be over the drink drive limit, is pretty intentional

Like I said, fine lines of distinction.
May be intentional but proving it is a different matter.
If I use my satnav to navigate through country lanes is it an attempt to avoid the police or is it simply having a quiet and pleasant drive home?
You can see people on motorways speeding past and braking in time with when my satnav says there is a camera.... regular sight on the M6 in the VSL sections.
It is easy to see that they are flouting the speed limit and using onboard kit to brake in time for the cameras.
But proving it is with intent ? Or simply forgetting their speed and hit the brakes cos the gantry sign reminded them of the limit?
That satnavs have POI where cameras are reported or more real time systems like Waze allow someone to speed with a measure of impunity, they also have a function of reminding you what speed limits apply so can be argued they help drivers who may be a little inattentive to stay within the law.
Intent or just an added safety feature?



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jdh
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 14:29
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QUOTE (typefish @ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 11:51) *
QUOTE (DancingDad @ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 - 12:57) *
One is a deliberate attempt to avoid detection, the other is simply taking advantage of readily available information, no different to learning where the cameras are on a regular route.
Very difficult to prove any intent to break the law by using a phone or satnav device to show camera location.
A lot simpler when a device is fitted which seems to have the sole purpose of defeating speed cameras.


I'd say using something like Waze to figure out where police activity would be, especially when you know you may be over the drink drive limit, is pretty intentional

One of my then-employees took a back road home from the pub, another car failed to give way at a junction and drove into the side of him. There was minimal damage, nothing more than a paint scuff on my employees vehicle but the other driver phoned the police to report the incident to get a number for the insurance claim. As luck would have it an officer was nearby and attended anyway, usual swapping of details and a quick "blow in the bag" and on their way except my employee blew over the limit. He was done for drink driving and became an ex-employee as a result.
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Fredd
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 17:28
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QUOTE (cp8759 @ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 12:54) *
QUOTE (Fredd @ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 10:55) *
There's also the minor problem that if they suddenly found that their equipment couldn't get a reading from one of dozens they'd targeted during that session, you could expect a visit from plod just the same as if you'd used a jammer. And as Rookie says, there'll be returns from plenty of other parts of the vehicle, which'll just heighten their suspicions.

They'd be hard-pressed to show that your car was coated in vantalack because you wanted to evade speed detection, rather than because it makes your car look cool. Thinking about it, it would look pretty cool.

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QUOTE (Surrey Nanosystems)
Can I apply Vantablack to my car?

Though this would undoubtedly result in an amazing looking motor, unfortunately the limitations of Vantablack in respect of direct impact or abrasion would make this an impractical proposition for most people. It would also be incredibly expensive.

Yes, very easy to explain away.


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The Rookie
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 18:10
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It would however be ideal for visiting the restaurant at the end of the universe, you may even get it stolen from the parking lot........ ‘so black’ ‘that light just seems to fall into it’.......

This post has been edited by The Rookie: Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 18:10


--------------------
There is no such thing as a law abiding motorist, just those who have been scammed and those yet to be scammed!

S172's
Rookies 1-0 Kent

Council PCN's
Rookies 1-0 Warwick
Rookies 1-0 Birmingham

PPC PCN's
Rookies 8-0 PPC's
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andy_foster
post Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 19:27
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QUOTE (typefish @ Tue, 12 Feb 2019 - 22:19) *
Are there any other offences out there that result on a charge of PCoJ if someone chooses to not pay a [private] third party company for the privilege of sitting in a room with other willing occupants - even if what they were doing at the time was not an offence?


Presumably the point that you are seeking to make is that we perhaps ought to be aware of the apparent irony that many motorists openly avoid prosecution by paying private companies for speed awareness courses, which have no basis in law, and that the police take a £35 cut from them, but when a motorist seeks to avoid liability for his crimes using his own scam, not endorsed by the police and not funding 'jobs for the boys', then he is a serious criminal?

I would however like to believe that no matter how fundamentally corrupt I might consider the application of speed awareness courses to be, the police's view was that the motorist in this case perverted the course of justice, rather than that the cheeky sod tried to diddle them out of 'their' £35. Also, taking your post as it was written, motorists are entitled not to pay the 'bribe' requested by the police, but if they do not take the course they are liable to be processed on a manner with actual basis in law, such as an offer of a fixed penalty or prosecution for the motoring offence.


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cp8759
post Fri, 15 Feb 2019 - 16:50
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QUOTE (Fredd @ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 - 17:28) *
QUOTE (Surrey Nanosystems)
Can I apply Vantablack to my car?

Though this would undoubtedly result in an amazing looking motor, unfortunately the limitations of Vantablack in respect of direct impact or abrasion would make this an impractical proposition for most people. It would also be incredibly expensive.

Yes, very easy to explain away.

Give it a few years, technology will improve, prices will come down...


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I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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Fredd
post Fri, 15 Feb 2019 - 17:26
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QUOTE (cp8759 @ Fri, 15 Feb 2019 - 16:50) *
Give it a few years, technology will improve, prices will come down...

Seems optimistic given the glacial progress in developing IR absorbent coatings over the last 30 years or so. By the time this stuff becomes viable for such trivial applications as defeating laser speed guns we'll all be driving cars that automatically obey speed limits, with no override, anyway.


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cp8759
post Fri, 15 Feb 2019 - 17:59
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QUOTE (Fredd @ Fri, 15 Feb 2019 - 17:26) *
QUOTE (cp8759 @ Fri, 15 Feb 2019 - 16:50) *
Give it a few years, technology will improve, prices will come down...

Seems optimistic given the glacial progress in developing IR absorbent coatings over the last 30 years or so. By the time this stuff becomes viable for such trivial applications as defeating laser speed guns we'll all be driving cars that automatically obey speed limits, with no override, anyway.

I refer you once more to VRM AB 171. Just because manufacturers keep creating more and more stupid features (such as electronic handbrakes), does not mean I'll ever drive one.


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I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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