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Insurer’s repairer vs. manufacturer “approved” repairer
m7891
post Thu, 27 Dec 2018 - 20:28
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Long story short - I need to get some accident damage repaired on my car (my fault, hit a stationary object...don’t ask).

The best quote I had was still over £1k, so I’ve decided to go through insurance and take the premiums hit for a few years. I’ve a £0 excess and protected NCD so no worries on that front.

My dilemma is that my car is still under manufacturer’s warranty and they, as you’d expect, are pushing me towards an “approved repair centre”. Not just for OEM parts, but also (they claim) the certified expertise, tools etc. The car is also on PCP, and the work will also be guaranteed to pass the condition check should I want to hand the car back at the end.

The insurer of course is pushing me to their authorised repair shop and assure me that OEM parts will be used and everything will be done to a high standard. If I do want to use my own repair shop there’s a £200 excess.

Neither viewpoint comes as a surprise of course but I’m struggling to decide what’s best.

I’m sure I’m not the first person to face this dilemma. It’s obviously a personal choice but I’d be interested to hear other people’s views.
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post Thu, 27 Dec 2018 - 20:28
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m7891
post Tue, 1 Jan 2019 - 23:31
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QUOTE (hcandersen @ Tue, 1 Jan 2019 - 22:22) *
But does this exclude their input?

The reference has to be set within a context in the Ts and Cs, it cannot just stand alone.


My policy states that if I choose their recommended repairer, I receive the following “benefits”:

- any repairs carried out by the “recommended repairer” are guaranteed for five years
- courtesy car

It then states that if I don’t use the recommended repairer, I lose these “benefits”. That suggests that if there’s any issues, I’m subject to my chosen repairer’s warranty procedures and there’s no need to trouble my insurer.

My chosen bodyshop had to submit photographs and their estimate to the esure either via Audatex, or email. Esure’s “mechanics” (as they called them) would then make an assessment, presumably to verify that it’s a real place rather than to veto the cost, since legally the choice of repairer is mine.
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mickR
post Wed, 2 Jan 2019 - 00:06
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QUOTE (hcandersen @ Tue, 1 Jan 2019 - 21:58) *
The relavant warranty would be anti perforation and paint defect.

Would it? All the OP stated was it had a manufacturer's warranty. No idea what this covered and indeed no idea of the damage. Such is the stuff of lengthy discussions.

And an insured can elect which repairer and expect the insurer to pick up the tab and liability? Pl refer me to something to support this.

All insurance led repairs should have a warranty equal to the manufacturer.


Should or do? What is the actual as opposed to preferred or theoretical position?

OP, you posted: ', I opted to pay the £200 excess to have a Reanult approved repairer do the work. '

So this was part of your policy i.e. the insurer would allow you to select a repairer of your choice alone subject to them charging you £200. A flat £200 even if you'd used Bodgit and Co and no input or veto by the insurer?


It's clear you have no knowledge of the motor repair industry.
Your repeated points have already been answered.
JLC in post #12 gave a link which referenced the authority regarding this, as you haven't read it here is the relevant part.
"The right to use your own repairer is covered under the consumer rights directive 1993, The Association of British Insurer's (A.B.I.) What was the Office of Fair Trade (OFT) the Financial Service Authority(FSA) which is now the FCA and the Vehicle Body Repair Association (VBRA/RMI) all agreed that the consumer has the right to choose!"

If your questions are in order to gain knowledge I'm happy to contribute however they appear to be argmentitive and if so I'll refrain.

I might suggest you phone your own insurance Co and simply ask if you are within your rights to use an independent insurer and what their position is regarding repair warranty and manufactures warranty if you use their "recommended" repairer.
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glasgow_bhoy
post Thu, 3 Jan 2019 - 22:49
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QUOTE (m7891 @ Tue, 1 Jan 2019 - 23:31) *
My chosen bodyshop had to submit photographs and their estimate to the esure either via Audatex, or email. Esure’s “mechanics” (as they called them) would then make an assessment, presumably to verify that it’s a real place rather than to veto the cost, since legally the choice of repairer is mine.

Audatex... where the bodyshops pay £15 or so just to carry out and submit an estimate.

No wonder its cheaper using backstreet repairers.
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mickR
post Thu, 3 Jan 2019 - 22:58
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Audatex and video assessment, not really an ideal opportunity to exaggerate estimated damage at all laugh.gif
And all to save the insurance Co sending an engineer, an actual real person to evaluate the actual real damage
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