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Opt-In Data Emails
StuartBu
post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 16:45
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Is anyone else being inundated with emails asking you to optin to continue receiving contact from various sources citing the GDPR changes. Every day for a couple of weeks I've been getting them so dunno when they'll finally stop. Some of them where you just have to click one button are ok but some you need to go to their website to do it.
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post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 16:45
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BaggieBoy
post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 17:13
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Presumably they will stop on the 25th, after which if you haven't opted in then they could be fined for sending you the message asking you to opt in.
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bama
post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 20:07
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unkless you reallu really want them to keep your details then just ignore them.

or send them a contract with your daily rate for 'data verification and clean up'
that shoukd stop the e-mails....


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Which facts in any situation or problem are “essential” and what makes them “essential”? If the “essential” facts are said to depend on the principles involved, then the whole business, all too obviously, goes right around in a circle. In the light of one principle or set of principles, one bunch of facts will be the “essential” ones; in the light of another principle or set of principles, a different bunch of facts will be “essential.” In order to settle on the right facts you first have to pick your principles, although the whole point of finding the facts was to indicate which principles apply.

Note that I am not legally qualified and any and all statements made are "Reserved". Liability for application lies with the reader.
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Fredd
post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 21:31
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QUOTE (StuartBu @ Tue, 22 May 2018 - 17:45) *
Is anyone else being inundated with emails asking you to optin to continue receiving contact from various sources citing the GDPR changes. Every day for a couple of weeks I've been getting them so dunno when they'll finally stop. Some of them where you just have to click one button are ok but some you need to go to their website to do it.

It's mostly because under GDPR they have to obtain, and retain evidence that they obtained, positive consent to sending you marketing emails etc. Since in the past the practice has mostly been to pre-tick consent boxes or use the "by using this site you agree to..." formula, they need to explicitly ask for your consent. In principle they have 2 more days to make themselves compliant, so those emails should stop about then - although I expect that in reality there'll be a lengthy period of establishing what practices do and don't adequately comply with the regulation before there's any significant enforcement action taken. For instance, here's a no doubt good overview of GDPR from an IT perspective, with an (unintentionally?) ironic sign-up form that presumably hopes to sidestep the requirement for consent to be freely given, or withheld, by asking for a "corporate email address"; can't see that one flying, but it does show someof the confusion out there ATM.


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Redivi
post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 21:33
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I'm welcoming the emails and the opportunity to ignore

Might cut down on the 200+ emails I receive every day of which I usually open no more than four
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glasgow_bhoy
post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 21:36
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Its yet another ill thought of idea from our glorious law makers. It affects my job far too much for my liking and just makes life harder.

As for the mass panic emails companies are sending out now- the past few weeks have been more annoying for spam than all the spam I've had the past 10 years added together.

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Redivi
post Tue, 22 May 2018 - 22:23
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Had a bizarre message today telling me that the legislation, as written, meant I had to take account of American travellers in the airspace above my business

Even if it were so, which airspace ?

The accountant where my business is registered ?
My home office where I operate ?
The virtual office where I pretend to operate ?
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ManxRed
post Wed, 23 May 2018 - 09:16
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QUOTE (Redivi @ Tue, 22 May 2018 - 23:23) *
Had a bizarre message today telling me that the legislation, as written, meant I had to take account of American travellers in the airspace above my business

Even if it were so, which airspace ?

The accountant where my business is registered ?
My home office where I operate ?
The virtual office where I pretend to operate ?


And does it have to be the fuselage where the people are located that passes through the airspace or just a tip of one of the wings?

I got one at work from some company that started spamming me a few months ago, asking if I'd opt in to continue being spammed by them. Really, you couldn't make it up.


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Sometimes I use big words I don't understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis.
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bama
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 11:52
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lots of chickens seem to become headless over GDPR.
you wouldn't believe some of the claptrap things some companies are doing. nor the knee jek (some knee but mostly jerk) things some middle level managers are coming up with - not much clear coporate policy or understanding around on this one it seems. Fairy typical response when there is legislation that creates accountability and the risk that someone may the carry the can.


--------------------
Which facts in any situation or problem are “essential” and what makes them “essential”? If the “essential” facts are said to depend on the principles involved, then the whole business, all too obviously, goes right around in a circle. In the light of one principle or set of principles, one bunch of facts will be the “essential” ones; in the light of another principle or set of principles, a different bunch of facts will be “essential.” In order to settle on the right facts you first have to pick your principles, although the whole point of finding the facts was to indicate which principles apply.

Note that I am not legally qualified and any and all statements made are "Reserved". Liability for application lies with the reader.
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Fredd
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 12:16
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QUOTE (bama @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 12:52) *
Fairy typical response when there is legislation that creates accountability and the risk that someone may the carry the can.

It's fairly typical when government introduces new legislation that deals largely in principles, offers little guidance as to what will be acceptable and what won't when endeavouring to comply, and threatens crippling penalties if you get it wrong - you play it safe. It's reminiscent of "cookie consent", but on steroids.


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ford poplar
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 12:28
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GDPR is EU legislation which the UK currently has to adopt.
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Jlc
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 12:40
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QUOTE (ford poplar @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 13:28) *
GDPR is EU legislation which the UK currently has to adopt.

It's an EU-wide regulation and applies to all member states by default - there's no 'adoption'. (The DPA was a directive)

Once the UK leaves the EU then we become a 3rd county but one presumes adequacy would be agreed. We would enact our own data protection equivalent legislation.


--------------------
RK=Registered Keeper, OP=Original Poster (You!), CoFP=Conditional Offer of Fixed Penalty, NtK=Notice to Keeper, NtD=Notice to Driver
PoFA=Protection of Freedoms Act, SAC=Safety Awareness Course, NIP=Notice of Intended Prosecution, ADR=Alternative Dispute Resolution
PPC=Private Parking Company, LBCCC=Letter Before County Court Claim, PII=Personally Identifiable Information

Private Parking - remember, they just want your money and will say almost anything to get it.
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ManxRed
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 13:46
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A lot of the sticking points I'm coming up against are to do with liability levels for breaches, given the crippling penalties, and the unwillingness of contracting parties to assume all the financial risk when the contract itself might actually be worth buttons in comparison with the penalties.


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Sometimes I use big words I don't understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis.
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bama
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 14:28
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QUOTE (Fredd @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 13:16) *
QUOTE (bama @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 12:52) *
Fairy typical response when there is legislation that creates accountability and the risk that someone may the carry the can.

It's fairly typical when government introduces new legislation that deals largely in principles, offers little guidance as to what will be acceptable and what won't when endeavouring to comply, and threatens crippling penalties if you get it wrong - you play it safe. It's reminiscent of "cookie consent", but on steroids.


Spot on. Wooly stuff but explicit on the penalties. Reminds me of the TMA smile.gif
and loads of others..

Also creates plenty of opportunities for Clifford Chance, Slaughter and May type firms.
I have been on the recieving end of Clifford Chance stuff regarding EU stuff and am familiar with the quality and usefullness of their output in this regard.


--------------------
Which facts in any situation or problem are “essential” and what makes them “essential”? If the “essential” facts are said to depend on the principles involved, then the whole business, all too obviously, goes right around in a circle. In the light of one principle or set of principles, one bunch of facts will be the “essential” ones; in the light of another principle or set of principles, a different bunch of facts will be “essential.” In order to settle on the right facts you first have to pick your principles, although the whole point of finding the facts was to indicate which principles apply.

Note that I am not legally qualified and any and all statements made are "Reserved". Liability for application lies with the reader.
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Redivi
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 17:45
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Best message yet :

Goodbye. Sorry you're really not worth a £2m fine from the GDPR police
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jdh
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 20:40
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Reading plenty of stories on twitter of firms sending this stuff out under CC not BCC, which in itself causes problems for the recipients as they could be classed as keeping the data too now!
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Churchmouse
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 21:02
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QUOTE (Jlc @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 13:40) *
QUOTE (ford poplar @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 13:28) *
GDPR is EU legislation which the UK currently has to adopt.

It's an EU-wide regulation and applies to all member states by default - there's no 'adoption'. (The DPA was a directive)

Once the UK leaves the EU then we become a 3rd county but one presumes adequacy would be agreed. We would enact our own data protection equivalent legislation.

If the UK leaves the EU... The UK already has the Data Protection Act 1998, which always seemed fairly comprehensive to me. I am aware of no pressing need for the UK to transpose the GDPR into UK law post Brexit.

--Churchmouse
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Redivi
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 21:41
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Reports that a lot of people are already getting defrauded by phishing emails that require them to provide bank details to comply with GDPR

Law of Unintended Consequences strikes again

This post has been edited by Redivi: Thu, 24 May 2018 - 21:41
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typefish
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 22:17
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QUOTE (Redivi @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 18:45) *
Best message yet :

Goodbye. Sorry you're really not worth a £2m fine from the GDPR police


Best one I've seen is an email, almost word for word:

QUOTE
<Company Logo>

GDPR, bla bla bla, who cares.

QUOTE
Image of happy clown, image caption of HELL YEAH

QUOTE
Image of sad frog, image caption of NO GO AWAY



This post has been edited by typefish: Thu, 24 May 2018 - 22:18
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StuartBu
post Thu, 24 May 2018 - 23:48
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QUOTE (jdh @ Thu, 24 May 2018 - 21:40) *
Reading plenty of stories on twitter of firms sending this stuff out under CC not BCC, which in itself causes problems for the recipients as they could be classed as keeping the data too now!

And it was said on the News earlier this evening that most of these emails didnt need to have been sent to those who were existing customers of the company sending them ... something about a "soft optin" Almost every one I got was from a company I had previous dealings with.

This post has been edited by StuartBu: Thu, 24 May 2018 - 23:50
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