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Car damage from gritter lorry
Pezzy
post Sat, 5 Jan 2019 - 11:07
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I just had my car resprayed two weeks ago so it was like new. On Thursday I passed a gritter lorry on the motorway that shot out what looked like pea sized grit hitting the front and side of my car. I'm now left with a lot of stone chips as a result.

What's the best way to proceed in making a claim against the council to pay for the damage?
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post Sat, 5 Jan 2019 - 11:07
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DancingDad
post Mon, 7 Jan 2019 - 14:09
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QUOTE (southpaw82 @ Mon, 7 Jan 2019 - 13:58) *
QUOTE (cp8759 @ Mon, 7 Jan 2019 - 13:52) *
Depends if they have salaried staff tasked with dealing with such matters, in which case the marginal cost of defending the claim would be minimal.

Would HE use the GLS or is that all framed out anyway (if HE are the proper defendant)?



On a motorway almost certain that HE would be the defendant, they are responsible for Motorways and Major Trunk Roads.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/...ighways-england
They may subcontract the work but not the liability.
How to claim.... https://www.gov.uk/claim-for-damage-to-your-vehicle
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cp8759
post Mon, 7 Jan 2019 - 14:27
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QUOTE (southpaw82 @ Mon, 7 Jan 2019 - 13:58) *
QUOTE (cp8759 @ Mon, 7 Jan 2019 - 13:52) *
Depends if they have salaried staff tasked with dealing with such matters, in which case the marginal cost of defending the claim would be minimal.

Would HE use the GLS or is that all framed out anyway (if HE are the proper defendant)?

I don't imagine GLS get involved in claims unless the amounts involved are significant, a claim for vehicle damage must be a matter of routine for HE so I would have thought HE would either have in-house staff, or they might have outsourced to a claim handling company like some councils do. In either case, the marginal cost of handling a claim won't be that high.


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glasgow_bhoy
post Thu, 10 Jan 2019 - 11:31
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I'm confused. Why aren't you pursuing the bodyshop? The cars paint should have been able to withstand some grit- its a pretty common feature on UK roads.

More so, if you could see the salt was pea-sized pieces, why did you not hang significantly back from the truck?

I'm not sure if its possible- others will have to advise. But could you do a freedom of information to the highways authority to find out how many other drivers complained about the salt coming out of that truck on that day? If there were other complaints, perhaps you've got more of a chance. If nobody else has complained of damage I think your issue should be with the bodyshop or your driving so close to the truck with soft paint.
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notmeatloaf
post Fri, 11 Jan 2019 - 22:38
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A quick Google shows that my initial disbelief was misplaced. HE specify that the salt must be 6.3mm wide which, without getting one out the freezer, must be about pea sized.

Back of a fag packet maths suggests the weight of each would be 0.3g

You barely feel them on a pushbikes, but I may just have fantastic paintwork.


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The Rookie
post Sat, 12 Jan 2019 - 03:28
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No its because, like all proper cyclists, you are as 'ard as nails.......

Too add, while we used to 'grit' our roads (a mix of salt and 'grit' - fine gravel) nearly all the spreading now is salt, grit is useful in colder temperatures with snow as it sits in the surface of the snow and provides friction, as usually all we are dealing with is ice or slushy melting snow in the UK we just use salt, which is not only a much lower density but also not overly damaging on impacts (compared to actual grit).


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DancingDad
post Sat, 12 Jan 2019 - 08:09
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QUOTE (notmeatloaf @ Fri, 11 Jan 2019 - 22:38) *
A quick Google shows that my initial disbelief was misplaced. HE specify that the salt must be 6.3mm wide .…...


I think you will find a maximum of 6.3mm diameter is the spec.
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notmeatloaf
post Sun, 13 Jan 2019 - 20:55
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QUOTE (DancingDad @ Sat, 12 Jan 2019 - 08:09) *
QUOTE (notmeatloaf @ Fri, 11 Jan 2019 - 22:38) *
A quick Google shows that my initial disbelief was misplaced. HE specify that the salt must be 6.3mm wide .…...


I think you will find a maximum of 6.3mm diameter is the spec.

The spec was saying that larger or smaller was less effective. Though I'm sure there is permitted variation the impression I got was that there was nominal consistency.

Thinking about it makes sense, the spreading apparatus seems fairly rudimentary and I suppose there is reliance on the salt being relatively uniform.


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baroudeur
post Mon, 14 Jan 2019 - 15:04
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QUOTE (notmeatloaf @ Sun, 13 Jan 2019 - 20:55) *
QUOTE (DancingDad @ Sat, 12 Jan 2019 - 08:09) *
QUOTE (notmeatloaf @ Fri, 11 Jan 2019 - 22:38) *
A quick Google shows that my initial disbelief was misplaced. HE specify that the salt must be 6.3mm wide .…...


I think you will find a maximum of 6.3mm diameter is the spec.

The spec was saying that larger or smaller was less effective. Though I'm sure there is permitted variation the impression I got was that there was nominal consistency.

Thinking about it makes sense, the spreading apparatus seems fairly rudimentary and I suppose there is reliance on the salt being relatively uniform.


Gritters may appear rudimentary but are quite controllable. The spread is adjusted from the cab by altering the speed and height of the disc and the rate of flow from the hopper. The spread rate is determined by the weather conditions and forecast.

When a motorway gritter spreads from the centre of the lanes the intention is to cover all lanes in one pass so the height and speed of the spinning disc is set to ensure that the outermost edges of the carriageways are included. When gritting in an urban environment a lower disc height and speed can be used. Road salt is never going to be the size of table salt granules and the addition of any sort of grit is rare unless specific conditions demand it. Claims for damage by salt were rarely met as, generally, they couldn't be substantiated. Spraying liquid salt solutions have been tried but do not appear to be in use currently.
I live next to a motorway and use it regularly. When I see a gritter operating ahead I drop speed to maintain a safe distance from the spread as they usually travel at around 40-50 mph so any delay caused is minimal.
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Pezzy
post Tue, 15 Jan 2019 - 09:55
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QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Thu, 10 Jan 2019 - 11:31) *
I'm confused. Why aren't you pursuing the bodyshop? The cars paint should have been able to withstand some grit- its a pretty common feature on UK roads.

More so, if you could see the salt was pea-sized pieces, why did you not hang significantly back from the truck?

I'm not sure if its possible- others will have to advise. But could you do a freedom of information to the highways authority to find out how many other drivers complained about the salt coming out of that truck on that day? If there were other complaints, perhaps you've got more of a chance. If nobody else has complained of damage I think your issue should be with the bodyshop or your driving so close to the truck with soft paint.


I'm not sure how the bodyshop has any significance here as they are a professional outfit that has a proper booth for the paint to bake/cure. I think people claiming for this kind of damage is far more common than people think as Highways England got back to me saying they've passed my query onto their claims team who will assist further. I'm not sure what it means at this stage so I will see when they reply.

I have explained earlier on why I didn't hang back.
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notmeatloaf
post Tue, 15 Jan 2019 - 10:02
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Altering the position of the disc and rate of salt is rudimentary to me.

The point remains that the salt has to be fairly uniform to know how far it will spread.


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