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Dundee woman cannot pay PPC, Declared bankrupt
Quicksilver
post Thu, 12 Oct 2017 - 22:32
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See:

http://www.scotsman.com/news/dundee-parkin...debts-1-4585558

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ManxRed
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 08:17
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Bloody Hell.

You can see where the Chinese Whispers of misplaced and outdated forum advice (not this one though!) have resulted in a very expensive misconception on the validity of these tickets. The Man Down The Pub has a lot to answer for.

Silly woman though. You'd think, for the amount of money involved, she could have spared 10 minutes for Google to see if she was doing the right thing


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The Rookie
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 09:36
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I'm not even sure where 'unenforceable in Scotland' ever came from, much harder to enforce for sure (even pre PoFA) but certainly not unenforceable

So sure of her position that even after running up say £5K in tickets she carried on doing it with no research at all.

Not sure it's the 'man down the pub' anymore but social media 'group think'.

Good news is I guess that VCS will presumably get nothing!

This post has been edited by The Rookie: Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 09:37


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seank
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 10:40
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What difference will it make to her?
She's 29 years old, so a member of the snowflake generation. In an age where such people live today and don't worry about tomorrow, I don't think she'll be bothered.
When I bought my first house, in 1976, the mortgage interest rate reached 14% APR. Nowadays, I'm lucky to get 2% interest on my savings as the snowflakes borrow vast sums at piffling interest rates.
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roythebus
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 11:14
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Since when can a PPC impose fines?
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glasgow_bhoy
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 13:24
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QUOTE (seank @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 11:40) *
What difference will it make to her?
She's 29 years old, so a member of the snowflake generation. In an age where such people live today and don't worry about tomorrow, I don't think she'll be bothered.
When I bought my first house, in 1976, the mortgage interest rate reached 14% APR. Nowadays, I'm lucky to get 2% interest on my savings as the snowflakes borrow vast sums at piffling interest rates.

Have you got an issue with people younger than you? You've made comments in this an another thread which suggest this.

The reason us 'younger' generations have to borrow so much in mortgages for instance is because of the older generations actions pushing prices up. A flat which cost £20,000 in 1985 costing £122,500 in 2016. A house costing £75,000 costing £265,000 in 2015. These ridiculous increases in price happened under your generations watch, not mine. 'Live today don't worry about tomorrow' is an ethos which has lived through your generation too. Working men in the past getting paid on a Thursday were often guilty of drinking their pay packet before even getting home to their families. Perhaps it wasn't an issue in middle and upper classes- quite similar to today really.

Glad to see VCS not getting a penny in this case though- clearly this woman wasn't great with money if she had a further £12.5k in debts.

This post has been edited by glasgow_bhoy: Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 13:26
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fedup2
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:04
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QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:24) *
QUOTE (seank @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 11:40) *
What difference will it make to her?
She's 29 years old, so a member of the snowflake generation. In an age where such people live today and don't worry about tomorrow, I don't think she'll be bothered.
When I bought my first house, in 1976, the mortgage interest rate reached 14% APR. Nowadays, I'm lucky to get 2% interest on my savings as the snowflakes borrow vast sums at piffling interest rates.

Have you got an issue with people younger than you? You've made comments in this an another thread which suggest this.

The reason us 'younger' generations have to borrow so much in mortgages for instance is because of the older generations actions pushing prices up. A flat which cost £20,000 in 1985 costing £122,500 in 2016. A house costing £75,000 costing £265,000 in 2015. These ridiculous increases in price happened under your generations watch, not mine. 'Live today don't worry about tomorrow' is an ethos which has lived through your generation too. Working men in the past getting paid on a Thursday were often guilty of drinking their pay packet before even getting home to their families. Perhaps it wasn't an issue in middle and upper classes- quite similar to today really.

Glad to see VCS not getting a penny in this case though- clearly this woman wasn't great with money if she had a further £12.5k in debts.



The older generation didnt push prices up unless your singling out the sellers,buyers are hardly likely to.The banks and media tv programs etc all did, i remember the panic they caused at the time resulting in people paying lots of money for little more than a shed,often more than they could afford,really Stupid of them when there was cheaper options available i guess!
My guess is 8-10 million immigrants have landed in the last 15 years.Of course that wont have effected the house prices at all.Our generations watch? Ha ha some do peddle some tosh!
Ps working men can do with what they want with their money as far as im concerned,at least they were working,not in 'education' with the expectancy that everyone else foots the bill for that and their mental health issues caused by them needing signs to tell them when to tie their shoe laces or they will sue!

One thing is for sure,it wasnt the older generation that needed HOT labels putting on a cup of coffee!








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Fredd
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:15
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When there's a general shortage of housing what drives house prices is peoples' ability to pay. I can't remember any time when first time homes were anything other than a major stretch, and when interest rates went down or wages rose then house prices rose, and vice versa.

I had the delight of buying my first place just before interest rates ramped up rapidly to about 15%, leaving me for a couple of years with zero disposable income after paying mortgage, utilities, food and transport to work, for a flat worth 25% less than I'd paid for it. I don't doubt that young people find it really tough to get on the housing ladder today, but I don't think it's that different now from how it was when us oldies were the same age.


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DancingDad
post Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:47
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QUOTE (Fredd @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 15:15) *
........I had the delight of buying my first place just before interest rates ramped up rapidly to about 15%, leaving me for a couple of years with zero disposable income after paying mortgage, utilities, food and transport to work, for a flat worth 25% less than I'd paid for it. I don't doubt that young people find it really tough to get on the housing ladder today, but I don't think it's that different now from how it was when us oldies were the same age.


More or less the same for me.
Was a little stretched for a couple of years.
Would have foundered but hadn't pushed for the 3 times income guide on mortgages, just found a house I could comfortably afford..... until the interest hike.



This post has been edited by DancingDad: Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:49
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glasgow_bhoy
post Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 00:14
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QUOTE (fedup2 @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 15:04) *
QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:24) *
QUOTE (seank @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 11:40) *
What difference will it make to her?
She's 29 years old, so a member of the snowflake generation. In an age where such people live today and don't worry about tomorrow, I don't think she'll be bothered.
When I bought my first house, in 1976, the mortgage interest rate reached 14% APR. Nowadays, I'm lucky to get 2% interest on my savings as the snowflakes borrow vast sums at piffling interest rates.

Have you got an issue with people younger than you? You've made comments in this an another thread which suggest this.

The reason us 'younger' generations have to borrow so much in mortgages for instance is because of the older generations actions pushing prices up. A flat which cost £20,000 in 1985 costing £122,500 in 2016. A house costing £75,000 costing £265,000 in 2015. These ridiculous increases in price happened under your generations watch, not mine. 'Live today don't worry about tomorrow' is an ethos which has lived through your generation too. Working men in the past getting paid on a Thursday were often guilty of drinking their pay packet before even getting home to their families. Perhaps it wasn't an issue in middle and upper classes- quite similar to today really.

Glad to see VCS not getting a penny in this case though- clearly this woman wasn't great with money if she had a further £12.5k in debts.



The older generation didnt push prices up unless your singling out the sellers,buyers are hardly likely to.The banks and media tv programs etc all did, i remember the panic they caused at the time resulting in people paying lots of money for little more than a shed,often more than they could afford,really Stupid of them when there was cheaper options available i guess!
My guess is 8-10 million immigrants have landed in the last 15 years.Of course that wont have effected the house prices at all.Our generations watch? Ha ha some do peddle some tosh!
Ps working men can do with what they want with their money as far as im concerned,at least they were working,not in 'education' with the expectancy that everyone else foots the bill for that and their mental health issues caused by them needing signs to tell them when to tie their shoe laces or they will sue!

One thing is for sure,it wasnt the older generation that needed HOT labels putting on a cup of coffee!

Sometimes I think you talk sense Fedup... then other times you come out with statements like the above.

Who was running the banks, the media and presenting the TV programs which you reckon pushed up prices? It was your peers, not mine.

I don't think immigrants have directly pushed up house prices. I believe immigration may have had an affect on rental prices at the lower end of the market, but you need to remember how many people have emigrated during that time.

I've no problem with working men doing what they want with their money- as long as we are clear its always happened and that being crap with money isn't something exclusive to younger people.
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ford poplar
post Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 03:38
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No one is suggesting the younger (snowlflake) generation are resp for all woes, just they lack the ability to 'balance income/expenditure in the hope someone else will pay the shortfall.
EU free movement and net UK immigration effect did influence the Brexit vote.
UK citizens are currently <£1Tn in debt, with little or no personal savings.
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fedup2
post Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 09:01
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QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 01:14) *
QUOTE (fedup2 @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 15:04) *
QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:24) *
QUOTE (seank @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 11:40) *
What difference will it make to her?
She's 29 years old, so a member of the snowflake generation. In an age where such people live today and don't worry about tomorrow, I don't think she'll be bothered.
When I bought my first house, in 1976, the mortgage interest rate reached 14% APR. Nowadays, I'm lucky to get 2% interest on my savings as the snowflakes borrow vast sums at piffling interest rates.

Have you got an issue with people younger than you? You've made comments in this an another thread which suggest this.

The reason us 'younger' generations have to borrow so much in mortgages for instance is because of the older generations actions pushing prices up. A flat which cost £20,000 in 1985 costing £122,500 in 2016. A house costing £75,000 costing £265,000 in 2015. These ridiculous increases in price happened under your generations watch, not mine. 'Live today don't worry about tomorrow' is an ethos which has lived through your generation too. Working men in the past getting paid on a Thursday were often guilty of drinking their pay packet before even getting home to their families. Perhaps it wasn't an issue in middle and upper classes- quite similar to today really.

Glad to see VCS not getting a penny in this case though- clearly this woman wasn't great with money if she had a further £12.5k in debts.



The older generation didnt push prices up unless your singling out the sellers,buyers are hardly likely to.The banks and media tv programs etc all did, i remember the panic they caused at the time resulting in people paying lots of money for little more than a shed,often more than they could afford,really Stupid of them when there was cheaper options available i guess!
My guess is 8-10 million immigrants have landed in the last 15 years.Of course that wont have effected the house prices at all.Our generations watch? Ha ha some do peddle some tosh!
Ps working men can do with what they want with their money as far as im concerned,at least they were working,not in 'education' with the expectancy that everyone else foots the bill for that and their mental health issues caused by them needing signs to tell them when to tie their shoe laces or they will sue!

One thing is for sure,it wasnt the older generation that needed HOT labels putting on a cup of coffee!

Sometimes I think you talk sense Fedup... then other times you come out with statements like the above.

Who was running the banks, the media and presenting the TV programs which you reckon pushed up prices? It was your peers, not mine.

I don't think immigrants have directly pushed up house prices. I believe immigration may have had an affect on rental prices at the lower end of the market, but you need to remember how many people have emigrated during that time.

I've no problem with working men doing what they want with their money- as long as we are clear its always happened and that being crap with money isn't something exclusive to younger people.


Who was running the banks? The same as now the elite who control everything as they do now.Are you saying that one morning the older generation got up and thought i know,ill put up the house i got for 40 grand up for sale for 150 grand? Instead of talking more tosh maybe you can explain it to us how the older generation managed it?
The people of this country were duped into it just the same as some are ok with the price of a chocolate bar staying the same while being told they have got smaller for our own good.Were ripped off at every turn because people cant see past their noses.
The older generation saw streets and streets of houses sytexed up nobody wanted them,then came the kosovans who had whole estates ring fenced for them.At the time i subbed to a council repairing the empty houses. There was 2 semis under the same roof.One went to and english family who got 300 quid in repairs despite windows falling out,yet next door got 8 grand and even got their floor boards painted grey before the carpet fitters came.Dont try and blame the older generation,they were just passengers in it.Its the Shambles,people like YOU keep voting in that did it,no one else.
Why do i need to remember how many people have emigrated? I saw it coming and watched it happen.Suddenly they found their houses were worth enough money to get the hell out of this shite hole and the wise ones did.

This post has been edited by fedup2: Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 09:02
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glasgow_bhoy
post Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 11:46
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QUOTE (fedup2 @ Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 10:01) *
QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 01:14) *
QUOTE (fedup2 @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 15:04) *
QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 14:24) *
QUOTE (seank @ Fri, 13 Oct 2017 - 11:40) *
What difference will it make to her?
She's 29 years old, so a member of the snowflake generation. In an age where such people live today and don't worry about tomorrow, I don't think she'll be bothered.
When I bought my first house, in 1976, the mortgage interest rate reached 14% APR. Nowadays, I'm lucky to get 2% interest on my savings as the snowflakes borrow vast sums at piffling interest rates.

Have you got an issue with people younger than you? You've made comments in this an another thread which suggest this.

The reason us 'younger' generations have to borrow so much in mortgages for instance is because of the older generations actions pushing prices up. A flat which cost £20,000 in 1985 costing £122,500 in 2016. A house costing £75,000 costing £265,000 in 2015. These ridiculous increases in price happened under your generations watch, not mine. 'Live today don't worry about tomorrow' is an ethos which has lived through your generation too. Working men in the past getting paid on a Thursday were often guilty of drinking their pay packet before even getting home to their families. Perhaps it wasn't an issue in middle and upper classes- quite similar to today really.

Glad to see VCS not getting a penny in this case though- clearly this woman wasn't great with money if she had a further £12.5k in debts.



The older generation didnt push prices up unless your singling out the sellers,buyers are hardly likely to.The banks and media tv programs etc all did, i remember the panic they caused at the time resulting in people paying lots of money for little more than a shed,often more than they could afford,really Stupid of them when there was cheaper options available i guess!
My guess is 8-10 million immigrants have landed in the last 15 years.Of course that wont have effected the house prices at all.Our generations watch? Ha ha some do peddle some tosh!
Ps working men can do with what they want with their money as far as im concerned,at least they were working,not in 'education' with the expectancy that everyone else foots the bill for that and their mental health issues caused by them needing signs to tell them when to tie their shoe laces or they will sue!

One thing is for sure,it wasnt the older generation that needed HOT labels putting on a cup of coffee!

Sometimes I think you talk sense Fedup... then other times you come out with statements like the above.

Who was running the banks, the media and presenting the TV programs which you reckon pushed up prices? It was your peers, not mine.

I don't think immigrants have directly pushed up house prices. I believe immigration may have had an affect on rental prices at the lower end of the market, but you need to remember how many people have emigrated during that time.

I've no problem with working men doing what they want with their money- as long as we are clear its always happened and that being crap with money isn't something exclusive to younger people.


Who was running the banks? The same as now the elite who control everything as they do now.Are you saying that one morning the older generation got up and thought i know,ill put up the house i got for 40 grand up for sale for 150 grand? Instead of talking more tosh maybe you can explain it to us how the older generation managed it?
The people of this country were duped into it just the same as some are ok with the price of a chocolate bar staying the same while being told they have got smaller for our own good.Were ripped off at every turn because people cant see past their noses.
The older generation saw streets and streets of houses sytexed up nobody wanted them,then came the kosovans who had whole estates ring fenced for them.At the time i subbed to a council repairing the empty houses. There was 2 semis under the same roof.One went to and english family who got 300 quid in repairs despite windows falling out,yet next door got 8 grand and even got their floor boards painted grey before the carpet fitters came.Dont try and blame the older generation,they were just passengers in it.Its the Shambles,people like YOU keep voting in that did it,no one else.
Why do i need to remember how many people have emigrated? I saw it coming and watched it happen.Suddenly they found their houses were worth enough money to get the hell out of this shite hole and the wise ones did.

None of the younger generations were in that elite... If members of the forum want to generalise about young people I'm well within my rights to generalise about older.

I still fail to see how immigration can have caused any of these issues. You've brought up one example, but perhaps the house with £8k spent on it required more work than the one with £300. I've seen first hand inside the damp infested overcrowded 2 bed council flat of an immigrant family. Equally I've seen inside the squaller many British council tennants live in. I don't think immigrants get treated any better than the natives.

By the way you mention the people I vote for causing this- who exactly do I vote for?

I brought up emigration as I couldn't understand why you brought up immigration and made the reasonable assumption that you were losing the plot and suggesting increasing population thanks to immigration was the blame for our woes. If this had been your argument (I now see it was not), I was merely suggesting immigration is more than balanced out by emigration. As a side note I don't think emigrating paid off for everyone- I still believe (despite its many, many downfalls) that the UK is one of the best places to live in the world.
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southpaw82
post Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 12:06
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QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 12:46) *
I still fail to see how immigration can have caused any of these issues.


Some rough figures (and they are rough): If net migration into the UK is circa 250,000 people per year and we put a figure of 4 persons (2 adults and 2 children) per household that's still an extra 62,500 homes to be built every year.

If we build fewer homes then supply and demand suggests that prices rise. Thankfully the UK is actually building more, completing about 140,000 new homes per year.

Of those new homes, 44.6% are required to keep up with immigration.

QUOTE
I was merely suggesting immigration is more than balanced out by emigration.


Net Migration

There are, of course, other factors contributing to housing issues but migration, specifically positive net migration, would seem to be a factor too.




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Ocelot
post Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 13:40
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QUOTE (southpaw82 @ Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 13:06) *
QUOTE (glasgow_bhoy @ Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 12:46) *
I still fail to see how immigration can have caused any of these issues.


Some rough figures (and they are rough): If net migration into the UK is circa 250,000 people per year and we put a figure of 4 persons (2 adults and 2 children) per household that's still an extra 62,500 homes to be built every year.

If we build fewer homes then supply and demand suggests that prices rise. Thankfully the UK is actually building more, completing about 140,000 new homes per year.

Of those new homes, 44.6% are required to keep up with immigration.

QUOTE
I was merely suggesting immigration is more than balanced out by emigration.


Net Migration

There are, of course, other factors contributing to housing issues but migration, specifically positive net migration, would seem to be a factor too.


Don't forget that migration is just one facet of population increase. Last year the UK population grew by 535,000, which will have an impact in the future.
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Fredd
post Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 14:06
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QUOTE (Ocelot @ Sat, 14 Oct 2017 - 14:40) *
Don't forget that migration is just one facet of population increase. Last year the UK population grew by 535,000, which will have an impact in the future.

Another powerful effect is average household size - down from 2.3 to 2.2 in a decade, which when you're talking about 22m+ households in England is a significant increase in demand.

An interesting stat: the number of households in England at the start of the 21st century was three and a half times higher than at the start of the 20th. Which helps explain why so many locations named as villages/ponds/heaths are now indistinguishable (other than to estate agents) parts of urban sprawl.


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