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Speeding on motorbike, Single Justice Procedure Notice, Few related questions
Heinrich
post Sun, 21 Jul 2019 - 20:06
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I got caught speeding when on my motorbike doing 96MHP on dual carriageway and now received Single Justice Procedure Notice. Very upset with myself to be honest, as I have clean licence for 7 years and there was no need to go that fast there, but it was early Sunday morning and road was just empty, so I didn't had any reference for few moments and didn't realized I was going that fast. Very expensive lesson... I don't think I have any other reasonable options apart from pleading guilty under 'Single Justice Procedure' which is I'm planning to do on-line? Few questions I have at the moment:

1. Mitigation section - I know I might sound naive, but I really would like to write something there. My main point, and I would like to hear what people will say, is that I was on motorbike and road was empty (so the only danger at that time I was to my own self) - even the same I can see in the police statement: 'there was no other vehicle on this section of road at this time'. I know, its not an excuse, but maybe this can be treated as some sort of mitigation? Or should I say, road was empty (as stated in the police statement) and since there was no other moving traffic that I am used to, I didn't had any reference point for a moment, and found myself going over the limit?

2. Where do I send my licence if I to fill this on-line, or would it say there when I will start on-line?

3. Do I need to supply any documentary evidences for the information I will provide within 'Statement of Means'? (pay slips, credit cards statements, etc.)

4. Can I drive once I submit this form and send away my licence?

5. Assuming I will get points, when do I notify my insurance companies, is it right away or on renewal date?
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Logician
post Mon, 22 Jul 2019 - 15:50
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QUOTE
Just thinking that motorbike in theory poses less danger to other people


I think that is rather doubtful, there is a very high accident rate amongst "born again" bikers now able to afford the sort of powerful bike they couldn't when they were younger, and while some of those will be single vehicle accidents, many will not. LINK
Not specifying you were on a bike probably works in your favour, if anything. As already mentioned, speeding penalties are quite prescriptive and you are unlikely to make any significant difference with even the most carefully constructed mitigation, and if you witter on too much you will just cause irritation, not that any magistrate would allow that to influence them.


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blackcross
post Mon, 22 Jul 2019 - 17:52
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Not specifying you were on a bike probably works in your favour, if anything.


The listing print specifies the vehicle registration, make and model. So the single justice won’t have much trouble figuring out you were on a bike, but I don’t think it will make a difference anyway. Traffic, whether as a full bench or single justice, is like shelling peas and the issue here is simply speed.

if anything is going to sway the penalty it is more likely to be “mitigation” that suggests you think it is ok to ignore the limit and so don’t really accept that you are guilty. You don’t want to risk being perceived as having made an equivocal plea.
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