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Dobbing in a drink driver
notmeatloaf
post Sat, 25 Aug 2018 - 22:43
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I was wondering what people's thoughts were about dobbing in drink drivers?

I was behind a VW tonight who was either blind drunk or incredibly stupid. Struggling to stay in lane, erratic speed, at one roundabout he totally misjudged the exit and headed off at a totally different angle to the road before doing an emergency stop across the oncoming lane.

In general I'm not a fan of dobbing people in especially driving through the countryside where there are few pedestrians or cyclists. However, it did get to the stage where I considered calling 999 because the driving was atrocious.

I have done it once before but where we were heading into a busy town on a Friday night. I figured drunk people on streets plus drunk driver could end badly. It was fairly impressive, the 999 operator asked me to tell them the route and suddenly three police cars came from different directions and surrounded the car. I asked them if they needed me to stay but they declined, I suppose they had all the evidence they needed anyway.

So... at what stage is someone's driving so bad you need to call the cops?
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post Sat, 25 Aug 2018 - 22:43
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StuartBu
post Sat, 25 Aug 2018 - 23:45
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Sounds from what you describe you would have been quite justified in calling in that driver. Ive only done it twice years ago - one where a neighbour hit a car in the street then drove out and parked in the next street. the other time was when I was coming out my street and a car came along the main road but on the wrong side of the road- with me following he turned left at the end still on wrong side then turned right and parked up in a side street and went to sleep. in both cases driver got nicked.
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Redivi
post Sat, 25 Aug 2018 - 23:45
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So... at what stage is someone's driving so bad you need to call the cops?

Good question

There have certainly been times when I've wondered afterwards if I should have called

A possible test - what would you do if you saw your daughter was a passenger ?

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cp8759
post Sat, 25 Aug 2018 - 23:58
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QUOTE (notmeatloaf @ Sat, 25 Aug 2018 - 23:43) *
So... at what stage is someone's driving so bad you need to call the cops?

I would suggest at the point where you believe there is a reasonable (as opposed to a remote or fanciful) risk that someone is going to get hurt. To put this into context, a friend of one of my cousins at uni had had a few too many, but everyone was drunk after a party and piled into his car to get back. A 17 year old passenger ended up dead and said friend ended up in prison.


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I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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southpaw82
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 00:03
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Zero tolerance.


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DancingDad
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 07:55
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A lot closer to zero tolerance then I was in the past.
Would not even consider it dobbing in these days, no more then I would hesitate to dial 999 if I saw a mugging or burglary in progress.

I've now got two youngsters in the family who drive. They are both probably fed up with my normal mantra when they go out.... No drinking and driving, no drugs and don't come home pregnant!
Whether it will do any good is anyone's guess but as a parent, got to try.
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Ocelot
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 10:08
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I would if it was obvious they were drunk and were driving erratically or dangerously.
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The Rookie
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 11:00
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If I thought they posed a risk to innocent third parties I’d be calling 999.

The question I ask myself is what would I say to an innocent victims family had I suspected and done nothing.


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samthecat
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 11:02
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QUOTE (southpaw82 @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 01:03) *
Zero tolerance.


Totally agree.

No excuse for drink driving, if they are intoxicated enough for it to be obvious to an observer they will be well over the limit.

I'm quite surprised anyone with any sort of moral compass would decide not to report based on reluctance to 'rat'!


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bobthesod
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 16:55
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Not playing Devils advocate but there as a vieo on Pistonheads of a driver ll over the road and finlly crahing

Turns out she was having a hypo? ( is that the right term?)

So not all erratic driving is due to being drunk
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cp8759
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 17:27
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QUOTE (bobthesod @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 17:55) *
Not playing Devils advocate but there as a vieo on Pistonheads of a driver ll over the road and finlly crahing

Turns out she was having a hypo? ( is that the right term?)

So not all erratic driving is due to being drunk

That makes no difference at all. If it's due to a known medical condition the driver should know to stop, and if insulin is involved you're looking at a drug driving charge.

If it's an undiagnosed condition, the sooner the police can pull the driver over and take them to hospital the better.


--------------------
I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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southpaw82
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 19:31
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QUOTE (bobthesod @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 17:55) *
Not playing Devils advocate but there as a vieo on Pistonheads of a driver ll over the road and finlly crahing

Turns out she was having a hypo? ( is that the right term?)

So not all erratic driving is due to being drunk

So? Still requires attention as a medical emergency.


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Any comments made do not constitute legal advice and should not be relied upon. No lawyer/client relationship should be assumed nor should any duty of care be owed.
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PASTMYBEST
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 20:35
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QUOTE (cp8759 @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 18:27) *
QUOTE (bobthesod @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 17:55) *
Not playing Devils advocate but there as a vieo on Pistonheads of a driver ll over the road and finlly crahing

Turns out she was having a hypo? ( is that the right term?)

So not all erratic driving is due to being drunk

That makes no difference at all. If it's due to a known medical condition the driver should know to stop, and if insulin is involved you're looking at a drug driving charge.

If it's an undiagnosed condition, the sooner the police can pull the driver over and take them to hospital the better.


No its lack of insulin that causes the hypo, the drug alleviates the condition


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cp8759
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 20:46
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QUOTE (PASTMYBEST @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 21:35) *
QUOTE (cp8759 @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 18:27) *
QUOTE (bobthesod @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 17:55) *
Not playing Devils advocate but there as a vieo on Pistonheads of a driver ll over the road and finlly crahing

Turns out she was having a hypo? ( is that the right term?)

So not all erratic driving is due to being drunk

That makes no difference at all. If it's due to a known medical condition the driver should know to stop, and if insulin is involved you're looking at a drug driving charge.

If it's an undiagnosed condition, the sooner the police can pull the driver over and take them to hospital the better.


No its lack of insulin that causes the hypo, the drug alleviates the condition

As a type 1 diabetic I can assure you insulin gives you hypos, the remedy is anything sugary. Lack of insulin only causes hypos on TV, for dramatic effect, because for the characters to be rushing around looking for a bottle of full fat coke or a mars bar isn't as dramatic as looking for insulin. When you get your 3 year medically restricted licence, one of the things you are specifically warned about is that if drive while having a hypo, you could be accused of drug driving, insulin being a drug (though not a controlled one).

This post has been edited by cp8759: Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 20:48


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I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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captain swoop
post Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 21:34
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QUOTE (cp8759 @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 21:46) *
QUOTE (PASTMYBEST @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 21:35) *
QUOTE (cp8759 @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 18:27) *
QUOTE (bobthesod @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 17:55) *
Not playing Devils advocate but there as a vieo on Pistonheads of a driver ll over the road and finlly crahing

Turns out she was having a hypo? ( is that the right term?)

So not all erratic driving is due to being drunk

That makes no difference at all. If it's due to a known medical condition the driver should know to stop, and if insulin is involved you're looking at a drug driving charge.

If it's an undiagnosed condition, the sooner the police can pull the driver over and take them to hospital the better.


No its lack of insulin that causes the hypo, the drug alleviates the condition

As a type 1 diabetic I can assure you insulin gives you hypos, the remedy is anything sugary. Lack of insulin only causes hypos on TV, for dramatic effect, because for the characters to be rushing around looking for a bottle of full fat coke or a mars bar isn't as dramatic as looking for insulin. When you get your 3 year medically restricted licence, one of the things you are specifically warned about is that if drive while having a hypo, you could be accused of drug driving, insulin being a drug (though not a controlled one).



Yup, Insulin causes the liver to convert more glucose into glycogen and causes muscle and fat tissue cells to take up glucose from the blood so it decreases blood sugar.
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The Rookie
post Mon, 27 Aug 2018 - 04:51
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QUOTE (PASTMYBEST @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 21:35) *
QUOTE (cp8759 @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 18:27) *
QUOTE (bobthesod @ Sun, 26 Aug 2018 - 17:55) *
Not playing Devils advocate but there as a vieo on Pistonheads of a driver ll over the road and finlly crahing

Turns out she was having a hypo? ( is that the right term?)

So not all erratic driving is due to being drunk

That makes no difference at all. If it's due to a known medical condition the driver should know to stop, and if insulin is involved you're looking at a drug driving charge.

If it's an undiagnosed condition, the sooner the police can pull the driver over and take them to hospital the better.


No its lack of insulin that causes the hypo, the drug alleviates the condition

Your thinking hyper......


--------------------
There is no such thing as a law abiding motorist, just those who have been scammed and those yet to be scammed!

S172's
Rookies 1-0 Kent

Council PCN's
Rookies 1-0 Warwick
Rookies 1-0 Birmingham

PPC PCN's
Rookies 8-0 PPC's
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nigelbb
post Mon, 27 Aug 2018 - 10:48
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A couple of years ago my partner & I were in the checkout queue in the Peterborough Waitrose behind a very drunk lady in her thirties who had a lot of difficulty paying by card but eventually got it right & left with her bottle of wine & a few other groceries in a bag. When we walked back to our car in the car park we passed the bag of groceries & broken bottle of wine on the floor. A few cars over from us was the drunk lady at the wheel of a large Mercedes 4x4 with the lights on & the engine running but with the driver's door partly open.

My partner called up the police describing the situation & gave the registration. We kept a watch until a police car turned up a few minutes later. My partner got a call a couple of hours later to thank her for reporting the issue & assure her that a lady was helping with their enquiries.


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notmeatloaf
post Mon, 27 Aug 2018 - 12:26
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I guess the issue though is where do you draw the line?

If you are reporting drunk drivers, where you can't be 100% certain, should you also report dangerous drivers? I stopped on my bike for a pedestrian crossing on a zebra crossing outside a school but the driver behind me decided to floor it and overtake at well over the 20mph speed limit, almost hitting the pedestrian. Do you dob them in as well?

As a cyclist you fairly frequently see people texting whilst driving in built up areas which is no less dangerous, do you dob them in too?

I doubt the police would have the time or interest to pursue every offence that, say, attracts six points or more - although they do seem to take drunk driving seriously.

This post has been edited by notmeatloaf: Mon, 27 Aug 2018 - 12:31
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666
post Mon, 27 Aug 2018 - 12:40
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QUOTE (notmeatloaf @ Mon, 27 Aug 2018 - 13:26) *
I guess the issue though is where do you draw the line?

If you are reporting drunk drivers, where you can't be 100% certain, should you also report dangerous drivers? I stopped on my bike for a pedestrian crossing on a zebra crossing outside a school but the driver behind me decided to floor it and overtake at well over the 20mph speed limit, almost hitting the pedestrian. Do you dob them in as well?

As a cyclist you fairly frequently see people texting whilst driving in built up areas which is no less dangerous, do you dob them in too?

I doubt the police would have the time or interest to pursue every offence that, say, attracts six points or more - although they do seem to take drunk driving seriously.

I think there is a very distinct line. With drink driving, the police will obtain their own objective evidence and you will play no further part.

In cases of dangerous driving, mobile phone use, etc. you will have to give a statement which may be challenged in court. Do uou want the hassle?
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cp8759
post Mon, 27 Aug 2018 - 12:56
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To be honest for mobile phone use, dangerous driving etc the police won't do anything unless there's video evidence, or at least two independent witnesses (And unless someone is nearly killed, good luck finding a random stranger who wants to get involved). But with drink driving, as stated above, the police will have their own evidence so you will never need to get involved beyond making the initial call.


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I am not on the "motorists's side", nor am I on the "police/CPS/council's" side, I am simply in favour of the rule of law.
No, I am not a lawyer.
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